New wave Japanese architecture / Kisho Kurokawa.

by Kurokawa, Kishō, 1934-2007Looking glass.

Publisher: London : Academy Editions 1993.Description: 300 pages : illustrations (some colour), plans ; 32cm.ISBN: 1854901532.Subject(s): Andō, Tadao, 1941-Looking glass | Itō, Toyoo, 1941-Looking glass | Architecture -- Japan -- History -- 20th centuryLooking glass
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This book provides an up-to-date illustrated account of current developments in Japanese architecture. It has been compiled by Kisho Kurokawa, himself an internationally celebrated architect, whose essay guides us towards understanding the innovative and exciting new projects which feature in this book. In addition, Kurokawa helps us to understand current projects against the background of Japan's distinctive and sometimes exclusive cultural and spiritual tradition.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

The ``new wave'' in Japanese architecture looks sleekly ultramodern and functional, yet according to architect Kurokawa, it reflects Japan's ``invisible tradition,'' a centuries-old philosophy of impermanence rooted in Buddhist thought. Kurokawa, a leader of Japan's Metabolist movement, which has challenged the Westernization of Japanese architecture, here assembles works by 28 new wave architects who comment on their own buildings in this lavishly illustrated survey. Some architects seek an indefinite form, like Takefumi Aida, whose Saito Memorial Hall creates a dynamic, fluid space with its layered repetitions of walls. Tadao Ando explores the Japanese tradition of light and shadow in the language of minimalism. Others, like Kan Izue, quote traditional Japanese architecture while relating their buildings to the environment. An underlying emotional sensitivity and a sense of the uncertainty of existence emanate from many of the projects showcased here. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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