Carol Twombly : her brief but brilliant career in type design / Nancy Stock-Allen.

by Stock-Allen, Nancy [author.]Looking glass.

Publisher: New Castle, Delaware : Oak Knoll Press, 2016.Edition: First edition.Description: 176 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.ISBN: 9781584563464; 158456346X.Subject(s): Twombly, Carol, 1959-Looking glass | Adobe Systems -- Employees -- BiographyLooking glass | Type designers -- United States -- BiographyLooking glass
Contents:
Introduction: women in twentieth century type design -- Part one: A digital type designer comes of age -- Part two: Twombly's decade at Adobe -- Type specimens.
Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 161-170) and index. Summary: This study is a fascinating inside look at digital type design, the rather mysterious career of one of its most important practitioners, and the history and culture of Adobe Type, with additional insight into other type designers of the digital era. It is difficult to imagine a graphic designer in the last quarter century who is not familiar with at least some of Carol Twombly's typefaces. Yet many of those who use her fonts today would be hard pressed to name their designer. Twombly studied at the Rhode Island School of Design under professor Charles Bigelow, and she also studied at the Bigelow & Holmes studio. She joined Adobe Systems in 1988, when the company was hiring young designers for the newly launched type department. During her ten years at Adobe, she designed some of the most recognizable and popular typefaces on the market today, including Trajan (1989), Charlemagne (1989), Lithos (1989), Adobe Caslon (1990), Myriad (1991, with Robert Slimbach), Viva (1993), Nueva (1994), and Chaparral (1997). In 1994, Twombly won the Prix Charles Peignot, given by the Association Typographique Internationale (ATypI) the first woman, and second American, to receive the award. Having achieved international recognition, Twombly was uncomfortable being in the public eye at conferences and in Adobe marketing materials. She also grew dissatisfied with changes at Adobe and with her evolving role at the company. In 1999 she left both Adobe and her career to pursue other artistic interests. Nancy Stock-Allen is a graphic designer and a blogger on subjects related to design, type, and women in design history. She was formerly Professor of Graphic Design and department chair at the Moore College of Art and Design. She interviewed and corresponded extensively with Carol Twombly and many of her associates and colleagues in writing this profile of a woman who rose to the top of a field historically dominated by men, at a time of barrier-breaking and technological revolution.
List(s) this item appears in: International Women's day
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Long loan Chelsea College of Arts
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 161-170) and index.

Introduction: women in twentieth century type design -- Part one: A digital type designer comes of age -- Part two: Twombly's decade at Adobe -- Type specimens.

This study is a fascinating inside look at digital type design, the rather mysterious career of one of its most important practitioners, and the history and culture of Adobe Type, with additional insight into other type designers of the digital era. It is difficult to imagine a graphic designer in the last quarter century who is not familiar with at least some of Carol Twombly's typefaces. Yet many of those who use her fonts today would be hard pressed to name their designer. Twombly studied at the Rhode Island School of Design under professor Charles Bigelow, and she also studied at the Bigelow & Holmes studio. She joined Adobe Systems in 1988, when the company was hiring young designers for the newly launched type department. During her ten years at Adobe, she designed some of the most recognizable and popular typefaces on the market today, including Trajan (1989), Charlemagne (1989), Lithos (1989), Adobe Caslon (1990), Myriad (1991, with Robert Slimbach), Viva (1993), Nueva (1994), and Chaparral (1997). In 1994, Twombly won the Prix Charles Peignot, given by the Association Typographique Internationale (ATypI) the first woman, and second American, to receive the award. Having achieved international recognition, Twombly was uncomfortable being in the public eye at conferences and in Adobe marketing materials. She also grew dissatisfied with changes at Adobe and with her evolving role at the company. In 1999 she left both Adobe and her career to pursue other artistic interests. Nancy Stock-Allen is a graphic designer and a blogger on subjects related to design, type, and women in design history. She was formerly Professor of Graphic Design and department chair at the Moore College of Art and Design. She interviewed and corresponded extensively with Carol Twombly and many of her associates and colleagues in writing this profile of a woman who rose to the top of a field historically dominated by men, at a time of barrier-breaking and technological revolution.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Stock-Allen (formerly, Moore College of Art and Design) has undertaken the task of studying contributions by women to the design arts. It is good that someone has begun to focus on this under-reported area. Twombly's popular font designs for Adobe during the 1990s were universally admired and have influenced type design since, especially revivals--see Paul Shaw's Revival Type: Digital Typefaces Inspired by the Past (CH, Nov'17, 55-0924). Twombly began working for Adobe at a time when high-end font design was still the province of large companies that could provide ample resources for the meticulous work and the discriminating eye. By the 2000s, the field was veering toward freelancers and the popularity of less carefully wrought (and less-expensive) designs. Twombly's Trajan, Charlemagne, and Lithos, all interpretations of historical forms, were created just as desktop publishing was placing font choice in everyone's hands. These designs were bold reinterpretations of the historical styles on which they were based. Twombly is known as a pioneer in this field, along with Gudrun Zapf von Hesse, one of the first women to achieve prominence in the black art of typeface and font design. Today, there are many women leaders in this field. This is a valuable addition to the scholarship in design history. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. --Steven Skaggs, University of Louisville

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