Liberty and security / Conor Gearty.

by Gearty, C. A [author.]Looking glass.

Publisher: Cambridge, England ; Polity, 2013.Description: 146 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0745647189; 0745647197; 9780745647180; 9780745647197.Other title: Cover and spine title: Liberty & security.Subject(s): DemocracyLooking glass | Economic securityLooking glass | EqualityLooking glass | LibertyLooking glass
Contents:
1 Introduction -- 2 Struggling Towards the Universal -- 3 The Global Stage -- 4 The Enemy Within -- 5 A Very Partial Freedom -- 6 Cultural War -- 7 Returning to Universals.
Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 117-138) and index. Summary: All aspire to liberty and security in their lives but few people truly enjoy them. This book explains why this is so. In what Conor Gearty calls our 'neo-democratic' world, the proclamation of universal liberty and security is mocked by facts on the ground: the vast inequalities in supposedly free societies, the authoritarian regimes with regular elections, and the terrible socio-economic deprivation camouflaged by cynically proclaimed commitments to human rights. Gearty's book offers an explanation of how this has come about, providing also a criticism of the present age which tolerates it. He then goes on to set out a manifesto for a better future, a place where liberty and security can be rich platforms for everyone's life. The book identifies neo-democracies as those places which play at democracy so as to disguise the injustice at their core. But it is not just the new 'democracies' that have turned 'neo', the so-called established democracies are also hurtling in the same direction, as is the United Nations. A new vision of universal freedom is urgently required. Drawing on scholarship in law, human rights and political science this book argues for just such a vision, one in which the great achievements of our democratic past are not jettisoned as easily as were the socialist ideals of the original democracy-makers.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

All aspire to liberty and security in their lives but few people truly enjoy them. This book explains why this is so. In what Conor Gearty calls our 'neo-democratic' world, the proclamation of universal liberty and security is mocked by facts on the ground: the vast inequalities in supposedly free societies, the authoritarian regimes with regular elections, and the terrible socio-economic deprivation camouflaged by cynically proclaimed commitments to human rights.

Gearty's book offers an explanation of how this has come about, providing also a criticism of the present age which tolerates it. He then goes on to set out a manifesto for a better future, a place where liberty and security can be rich platforms for everyone's life.

The book identifies neo-democracies as those places which play at democracy so as to disguise the injustice at their core. But it is not just the new 'democracies' that have turned 'neo', the so-called established democracies are also hurtling in the same direction, as is the United Nations.

A new vision of universal freedom is urgently required. Drawing on scholarship in law, human rights and political science this book argues for just such a vision, one in which the great achievements of our democratic past are not jettisoned as easily as were the socialist ideals of the original democracy-makers.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 117-138) and index.

1 Introduction -- 2 Struggling Towards the Universal -- 3 The Global Stage -- 4 The Enemy Within -- 5 A Very Partial Freedom -- 6 Cultural War -- 7 Returning to Universals.

All aspire to liberty and security in their lives but few people truly enjoy them. This book explains why this is so. In what Conor Gearty calls our 'neo-democratic' world, the proclamation of universal liberty and security is mocked by facts on the ground: the vast inequalities in supposedly free societies, the authoritarian regimes with regular elections, and the terrible socio-economic deprivation camouflaged by cynically proclaimed commitments to human rights. Gearty's book offers an explanation of how this has come about, providing also a criticism of the present age which tolerates it. He then goes on to set out a manifesto for a better future, a place where liberty and security can be rich platforms for everyone's life. The book identifies neo-democracies as those places which play at democracy so as to disguise the injustice at their core. But it is not just the new 'democracies' that have turned 'neo', the so-called established democracies are also hurtling in the same direction, as is the United Nations. A new vision of universal freedom is urgently required. Drawing on scholarship in law, human rights and political science this book argues for just such a vision, one in which the great achievements of our democratic past are not jettisoned as easily as were the socialist ideals of the original democracy-makers.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowledgements (p. vi)
  • 1 Introduction (p. 1)
  • 2 Struggling Towards the Universal (p. 7)
  • 3 The Global Stage (p. 30)
  • 4 The Enemy Within (p. 50)
  • 5 A Very Partial Freedom (p. 72)
  • 6 Cultural War (p. 95)
  • 7 Returning to Universals (p. 108)
  • Notes (p. 117)
  • Index (p. 139)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Arguing for the twin pillars of rule of law and respect for human rights, Gearty (London School of Economics and Political Science) provides a Lockean rejoinder to Hobbes's "residual theory of liberty" that transferred all power to the Leviathan. Such emerging "neo-democracies" as Belarus, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Russia, Tajikistan, and Turkey--and distant transitional polities--pay lip service to human rights through international forums and official declarations. Even established "proto"-democracies, such as Great Britain and US, have moved to a position of the state's defending itself "at all costs." The individual cases are alarming, and Western hegemony through global institution is revealing. Decrying the gap between the state (national security) and the individual (human security), the author is nostalgic about the 1647 document by the Levellers. Gearty holds that liberty and security are an inseparable pair, the latter serving as the "platform" for the former. For him, the salient point is that violence against the state is a crime. In that vein, a criminal model for dealing with both transnational and domestic terrorism warrants fair, transparent due process in the judicial system. Only such a schema will rejuvenate the earlier cherished universality of liberty. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. R. G. Mainuddin North Carolina Central University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Conor Gearty is Professor of Human Rights Law at the London School of Economics and practises law at Matrix Chambers, of which he is a founder member.

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