Game after : a cultural study of video game afterlife / Raiford Guins.

by Guins, Raiford [author.]Looking glass.

Publisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts ; MIT Press, [2014]Description: xiv, 355 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0262019981; 9780262019989.Subject(s): Video games -- Social aspectsLooking glass
Contents:
Foreword -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Persistent games: -- Ex-game -- Afterlife and the culture of materiality -- Where is history in game studies? -- Now boarding -- Museified: -- Object lessened? -- Artifact-activity -- Slips -- Iconic object -- 2006_0102_04 -- Thinking Inside The (Archival) Box: -- Chronicled -- Era of collection -- Collection of no-things: Mr Higinbotham's oscilloscope of wonder -- After The Arcade: -- Unintentional monuments -- Curious cabinets -- Arcade projects: -- Behind the screen-or the totality of the thing -- eGameRevolution-or Space Invaders behind glass -- Videotopia: exhibit of the true history of video games-or itinerant antiques -- California extreme-the classic arcade game show-or another spin around the present -- American Classic Arcade Museum at Fun Spot-or welcome to the Musecade The International Arcade Museum-or online census project -- Remains of the game -- Thinking Outside The (Game Cartridge) Box: -- NRFB -- Container becomes content -- Cliff Spohn's evocative surfaces -- Landfill Legend: -- Classified -- Trashing E T -- E T as trash -- Memento Mori -- Postscript: Remains to be seen -- Game Saved: -- Restoration hardware -- Back to the fire buttons: vintage arcade superstore -- Supercade unbound: supercade collection -- Serving history: recreation of Tennis For Two -- Final walkthrough -- Appendix -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary: Overview: We purchase video games to play them, not to save them. What happens to video games when they are out of date, broken, nonfunctional, or obsolete? Should a game be considered an "ex-game" if it exists only as emulation, as an artifact in museum displays, in an archival box, or at the bottom of a landfill? In Game After, Raiford Guins focuses on video games not as hermetically sealed within time capsules of the past but on their material remains: how and where video games persist in the present. Guins meticulously investigates the complex life cycles of video games, to show how their meanings, uses, and values shift in an afterlife of disposal, ruins and remains, museums, archives, and private collections. Guins looks closely at video games as museum objects, discussing the recontextualization of the Pong and Brown Box prototypes and engaging with curatorial and archival practices across a range of cultural institutions; aging coin-op arcade cabinets; the documentation role of game cartridge artwork and packaging; the journey of a game from flawed product to trash to memorialized relic, as seen in the history of Atari's infamous E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial; and conservation, restoration, and re-creation stories told by experts including Van Burnham, Gene Lewin, and Peter Takacs. The afterlife of video games-whether behind glass in display cases or recreated as an iPad app-offers a new way to explore the diverse topography of game history.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan Chelsea College of Arts
Main collection
Printed books 794.8 GUI (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54213832
Long loan London College of Communication
Main collection
Printed books 794.8 GUI (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54212618
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A cultural study of video game afterlife, whether as emulation or artifact, in an archival box or at the bottom of a landfill.

We purchase video games to play them, not to save them. What happens to video games when they are out of date, broken, nonfunctional, or obsolete? Should a game be considered an "ex-game" if it exists only as emulation, as an artifact in museum displays, in an archival box, or at the bottom of a landfill? In Game After , Raiford Guins focuses on video games not as hermetically sealed within time capsules of the past but on their material remains: how and where video games persist in the present. Guins meticulously investigates the complex life cycles of video games, to show how their meanings, uses, and values shift in an afterlife of disposal, ruins and remains, museums, archives, and private collections.

Guins looks closely at video games as museum objects, discussing the recontextualization of the Pong and Brown Box prototypes and engaging with curatorial and archival practices across a range of cultural institutions; aging coin-op arcade cabinets; the documentation role of game cartridge artwork and packaging; the journey of a game from flawed product to trash to memorialized relic, as seen in the history of Atari's infamous E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial ; and conservation, restoration, and re-creation stories told by experts including Van Burnham, Gene Lewin, and Peter Takacs.

The afterlife of video games--whether behind glass in display cases or recreated as an iPad app--offers a new way to explore the diverse topography of game history.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Foreword -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Persistent games: -- Ex-game -- Afterlife and the culture of materiality -- Where is history in game studies? -- Now boarding -- Museified: -- Object lessened? -- Artifact-activity -- Slips -- Iconic object -- 2006_0102_04 -- Thinking Inside The (Archival) Box: -- Chronicled -- Era of collection -- Collection of no-things: Mr Higinbotham's oscilloscope of wonder -- After The Arcade: -- Unintentional monuments -- Curious cabinets -- Arcade projects: -- Behind the screen-or the totality of the thing -- eGameRevolution-or Space Invaders behind glass -- Videotopia: exhibit of the true history of video games-or itinerant antiques -- California extreme-the classic arcade game show-or another spin around the present -- American Classic Arcade Museum at Fun Spot-or welcome to the Musecade The International Arcade Museum-or online census project -- Remains of the game -- Thinking Outside The (Game Cartridge) Box: -- NRFB -- Container becomes content -- Cliff Spohn's evocative surfaces -- Landfill Legend: -- Classified -- Trashing E T -- E T as trash -- Memento Mori -- Postscript: Remains to be seen -- Game Saved: -- Restoration hardware -- Back to the fire buttons: vintage arcade superstore -- Supercade unbound: supercade collection -- Serving history: recreation of Tennis For Two -- Final walkthrough -- Appendix -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

Overview: We purchase video games to play them, not to save them. What happens to video games when they are out of date, broken, nonfunctional, or obsolete? Should a game be considered an "ex-game" if it exists only as emulation, as an artifact in museum displays, in an archival box, or at the bottom of a landfill? In Game After, Raiford Guins focuses on video games not as hermetically sealed within time capsules of the past but on their material remains: how and where video games persist in the present. Guins meticulously investigates the complex life cycles of video games, to show how their meanings, uses, and values shift in an afterlife of disposal, ruins and remains, museums, archives, and private collections. Guins looks closely at video games as museum objects, discussing the recontextualization of the Pong and Brown Box prototypes and engaging with curatorial and archival practices across a range of cultural institutions; aging coin-op arcade cabinets; the documentation role of game cartridge artwork and packaging; the journey of a game from flawed product to trash to memorialized relic, as seen in the history of Atari's infamous E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial; and conservation, restoration, and re-creation stories told by experts including Van Burnham, Gene Lewin, and Peter Takacs. The afterlife of video games-whether behind glass in display cases or recreated as an iPad app-offers a new way to explore the diverse topography of game history.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Foreword (p. ix)
  • Acknowledgments (p. xi)
  • Introduction: Persistent Games (p. 1)
  • Ex-Game (p. 1)
  • Afterlife and the Culture of Materiality (p. 5)
  • Where Is History in Game Studies? (p. 18)
  • Now Boarding (p. 26)
  • 1 Museified (p. 31)
  • Object Lessened? (p. 31)
  • Artifact-Activity (p. 35)
  • Slips (p. 52)
  • Iconic Object (p. 58)
  • 2006.0102.04 (p. 64)
  • 2 Thinking Inside the (Archival) Box (p. 75)
  • Chronicled (p. 75)
  • Era of Collection (p. 81)
  • Collection of No-Things: Mr. Higinbotham's Oscilloscope of Wonder (p. 94)
  • 3 After the Arcade (p. 107)
  • Unintentional Monuments (p. 107)
  • Curious Cabinets (p. 112)
  • Arcade Projects (p. 123)
  • "Behind the Screen," or the Totality of the Thing (p. 124)
  • "eGameRevolution," or Space Invaders behind Glass (p. 127)
  • "Videotopia: The Exhibit of the True History of Video Games," or Itinerant Antiques (p. 135)
  • California Extreme, the Classic Arcade Game Show, or Another Spin around the Present (p. 141)
  • American Classic Arcade Museum at Fun Spot, or Welcome to the Musecade (p. 148)
  • The International Arcade Museum, or Online Census Project (p. 152)
  • Remains of the Game (p. 157)
  • 4 Thinking Outside the (Game Cartridge) Box (p. 167)
  • NRFB (p. 167)
  • Container Becomes Content (p. 173)
  • Cliff Spohn's Evocative Surfaces (p. 181)
  • 5 Landfill Legend (p. 207)
  • Classified (p. 207)
  • Trashing E.T. (p. 211)
  • E.T. as Trash (p. 220)
  • Memento Mori (p. 230)
  • Postscript: Remains to Be Seen (p. 234)
  • 6 Game Saved (p. 237)
  • Restoration Hardware (p. 237)
  • Back to the Fire Buttons: Vintage Arcade Superstore (p. 239)
  • Supercade Unbound: The Supercade Collection (p. 250)
  • Serving History: The Recreation of Tennis For Two (p. 264)
  • Final Walkthrough (p. 277)
  • Appendix (p. 289)
  • Notes (p. 291)
  • Bibliography (p. 335)
  • Index (p. 349)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Guins's study of video games as cultural artifacts seems to this reviewer to owe much to Michel Foucault's work in such tomes as The Archaeology of Knowledge (Eng tr., 1972). In other words, Guins (culture and technology, Stony Brook Univ.) focuses on the way that the relationship between video games and culture evolves outside of the particular context of their own time. In his first chapter, "Museified," the author sets the tone as he examines video games and their place in modern museums. The later chapters, like "After the Arcade" and "Landfill Legend," build on this and, at least in the case of the latter, serve as a kind of counterpoint and expansion of Guins's discussion of the ways in which individuals react to video games after they are removed from their introductory context. The prose is often dense and jargon laden, but exhaustive endnotes help clarify sources. The philosophical perspective that informs this work makes it inappropriate for the casual reader. --William Herbert Harris, University of Texas at Brownsville

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Raiford Guins is Associate Professor of Culture and Technology at Stony Brook University. He is also founding principal editor of the Journal of Visual Culture and curator of the William A. Higinbotham Game Studies Collection.

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