The dictator's handbook : why bad behavior is almost always good politics / Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith.

by Bueno de Mesquita, Bruce, 1946- [author.]Looking glass; Smith, Alastair, 1967- [author.]Looking glass.

Publisher: New York : PublicAffairs, 2012.Description: xxv, 319 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.ISBN: 1610391845; 9781610391849.Subject(s): Political corruptionLooking glass | Political leadership -- Philosophy | Power (Social sciences)Looking glass
Contents:
Introduction: rules to rule by -- The rules of politics -- Coming to power -- Staying in power -- Steal from the poor, give to the rich -- Getting and spending -- If corruption empowers, then absolute corruption empowers absolutely -- Foreign aid -- The people in revolt -- War, peace, and world order -- What is to be done?
Note: Originally published in hardcover in 2011.Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 287-299) and index. Summary: Explains the theory of political survival, particularly in cases of dictators and despotic governments, arguing that political leaders seek to stay in power using any means necessary, most commonly by attending to the interests of certain coalitions.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan London College of Communication
Main collection
Printed books 321 BUE (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54212663
Total reservations: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A groundbreaking new theory of the real rules of politics: leaders do whatever keeps them in power, regardless of the national interest.
As featured on the viral video Rules for Rulers, which has been viewed over 3 million times.
Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith's canonical book on political science turned conventional wisdom on its head. They started from a single assertion: Leaders do whatever keeps them in power. They don't care about the "national interest"-or even their subjects-unless they have to.
This clever and accessible book shows that democracy is essentially just a convenient fiction. Governments do not differ in kind but only in the number of essential supporters, or backs that need scratching. The size of this group determines almost everything about politics: what leaders can get away with, and the quality of life or misery under them. The picture the authors paint is not pretty. But it just may be the truth, which is a good starting point for anyone seeking to improve human governance.

Originally published in hardcover in 2011.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 287-299) and index.

Introduction: rules to rule by -- The rules of politics -- Coming to power -- Staying in power -- Steal from the poor, give to the rich -- Getting and spending -- If corruption empowers, then absolute corruption empowers absolutely -- Foreign aid -- The people in revolt -- War, peace, and world order -- What is to be done?

Explains the theory of political survival, particularly in cases of dictators and despotic governments, arguing that political leaders seek to stay in power using any means necessary, most commonly by attending to the interests of certain coalitions.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction: Rules to Rule By (p. ix)
  • 1 The Rules of Politics (p. 1)
  • 2 Coming to Power (p. 21)
  • 3 Staying in Power (p. 49)
  • 4 Steal from the Poor, Give to the Rich (p. 75)
  • 5 Getting and Spending (p. 101)
  • 6 If Corruption Empowers, Then Absolute Corruption Empowers Absolutely (p. 127)
  • 7 Foreign Aid (p. 161)
  • 8 The People in Revolt (p. 195)
  • 9 War, Peace, and World Order (p. 225)
  • 10 What Is To Be Done? (p. 251)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 283)
  • Notes (p. 287)
  • Index (p. 301)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Bruce Bueno de Mesquita is the Julius Silver Professor of Politics and director of the Alexander Hamilton centre for Political Economy at New York University. He is the author of 16 books, including The Predictioneer's Game. Alastair Smith is professor of politics at New York University. The recipient of three grants from the National Science Foundation and author of three books, he was chosen as the 2005 Karl Deutsch Award winner, given biennially to the best international relations scholar under the age of 40.They are also the authors of The Spoils of War: Greed, Power, and the Conflicts That Made Our Greatest Presidents.

Footer