Computer games and the social imaginary / Graeme Kirkpatrick.

by Kirkpatrick, Graeme, 1963- [author.]Looking glass.

Series: Digital media and society series: Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; Polity Press, 2013.Description: viii, 219 pages ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0745641105; 0745641113; 9780745641102; 9780745641119.Subject(s): Computer games -- Social aspectsLooking glass | Online social networksLooking glass | Video gamersLooking glass | Video games -- Social aspectsLooking glass
Contents:
Computer games in social theory -- Lineages of the computer game -- The formation of gaming culture -- Technology and power -- The phenakisticon -- Aesthetics and politics.
Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-214) and index. Summary: Computer games have fundamentally altered the relation of self and society in the digital age. Analysing topics such as technology and power, the formation of gaming culture and the subjective impact of play with computer games, this text will be of great interest to students and scholars of digital media, games studies and the information society.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan Central Saint Martins
Main collection
Printed books 303.4833 KIR (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54193626
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In this compelling book, Graeme Kirkpatrick argues that computer games have fundamentally altered the relation of self and society in the digital age.

Tracing the origins of gaming to the revival of play in the 1960s counter culture, Computer Games and the Social Imaginary describes how the energies of that movement transformed computer technology from something ugly and machine-like into a world of colour and 'fun'. In the process, play with computers became computer gaming - a new cultural practice with its own values.

From the late 1980s gaming became a resource for people to draw upon as they faced the challenges of life in a new, globalizing digital economy. Gamer identity furnishes a revivified capitalism with compliant and 'streamlined' workers, but at times gaming culture also challenges the corporations that control game production.

Analysing topics such as the links between technology and power, the formation of gaming culture and the subjective impact of play with computer games, this insightful text will be of great interest to students and scholars of digital media, games studies and the information society.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-214) and index.

Computer games in social theory -- Lineages of the computer game -- The formation of gaming culture -- Technology and power -- The phenakisticon -- Aesthetics and politics.

Computer games have fundamentally altered the relation of self and society in the digital age. Analysing topics such as technology and power, the formation of gaming culture and the subjective impact of play with computer games, this text will be of great interest to students and scholars of digital media, games studies and the information society.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Despite common understanding about computer games as a form of entertainment originating in the 1980s, or as a branch of virtual reality as seen in the 2000s, computer games have a much longer history, spanning over four decades. Sociologist Kirkpatrick (Univ. of Manchester, UK) argues that digital culture and computer games have mutually affected each other's development. To show this complex and intimate interaction between the virtual (computer games) and the real (game experiences), Kirkpatrick first explores Luc Boltanski and Eve Chiapello's The New Spirit of Capitalism (CH, Sep'06, 44-0403). After this theoretical review, the book explores the history of computer games. Although Atari and Nintendo often receive credit as the pioneers of games, Kirkpatrick carefully examines games played on home computers outside of the US and Japan. Once computer games became a common feature of many households, they were commodified in the 1980s. In the succeeding decade, computer games became more dynamic, with massive, multiplayer online games. In a more contemporary context, computer games have become an aesthetic form. Kirkpatrick's work is very thorough. Although the book discusses theory, it is still written in accessible language. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. Y. Kiuchi Michigan State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Graeme Kirkpatrick is senior lecturer in sociology at the University of Manchester.

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