Hats by Madame Paulette : Paris milliner extraordinaire / Annie Schneider ; foreword by Stephen Jones.

by Schneider, Annie [author.]Looking glass; Jones, Stephen, 1957 May 31-Looking glass.

Publisher: London : Thames & Hudson, c2014Description: 160 pages : illustrations (some colour), portraits ; 31 cm.ISBN: 0500517312; 9780500517314.Subject(s): La Bruyère, Pauline de, 1900-1984Looking glass | Hats -- History | HeadgearLooking glass | MillineryLooking glass | Women's hatsLooking glass
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: Part 1 -- 1.The Early Years -- 2.Starting Off -- 3.The 1940s -- 4.Postwar Celebrity -- Part 2 -- 5.Famous Fittings -- 6.America Comes Calling -- 7.High Society -- 8.America Again -- 9.Stage and Screen -- 10.With Cecil Beaton -- Part 3 -- 11.By Appointment -- 12.End of an Era -- 13.The Couture Houses.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary: Madame Paulette was Paris's queen of milliners. Born in 1900, this famed headwear designer learned her trade between the wars, and by the forties and fifties her hats crowned the heads of everyone who was anyone in Paris, and were increasingly sought by the rich and famous around the world. Film stars such as Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, and Audrey Hepburn were some of her most ardent fans, as well as royalty, including Princess Grace of Monaco and the Duchess of Windsor.Hats by Madame Paulette will appeal to fashion experts and aficionados of fine millinery alike, providing an essential guide on the most indispensable fashion item of the mid-twentieth century; no woman would consider herself formally dressed without a hat. In addition to celebrities vying for Madame Paulettes creations, fashion photographers clamored for her designs. Included here are photographs from Avedon, Newton, Horst, and Klein, as well as film stills of the hats she designed for Cecil Beaton that appeared in My Fair Lady and Gigi.
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Short loan Central Saint Martins
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Long loan London College of Fashion
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Printed books 391.43 SCH (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54242007
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Printed books 391.43 SCH (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54242008
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Madame Paulette was Paris's 'queen of milliners'. She learned her trade between the wars, and by the 1940s and '50s her hats crowned the heads of everyone who was anyone in Paris, and increasingly were sought by the rich and famous around the world

Film stars such as Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Rita Hayworth and Audrey Hepburn were among those who favoured Madame Paulette's headwear; royal customers included Princess Grace of Monaco and the Duchess of Windsor. Cecil Beaton asked her to create the hats for My Fair Lady and Gigi , for which he won Academy Awards for Costume Design.

Astonishingly original, no two hats were alike. She designed perfect pillbox creations (as worn by Jackie Kennedy); tiny, exquisite confections of voile, ribbons and flowers; and her legendary 'turban-bicyclette', sought after by the modern, progressive woman (and famously worn by Simone de Beauvoir).

The great fashion photographers clamoured for her designs: Avedon, Newton, Horst and Klein vied for the latest Madame Paulette models for their fashion shoots in the pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar . Paris couturiers patronized Madame Paulette's atelier for her latest creations: as well as her friend Robert Piguet, designers such as Pierre Balmain, Pierre Cardin, Louis Féraud, Guy Laroche and Emanuel Ungaro depended on her skills. Gabrielle Chanel, a former hat-maker herself, came to her. Even in her eighties, Paulette created hats for designers Claude Montana and Thierry Mugler.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Machine generated contents note: Part 1 -- 1.The Early Years -- 2.Starting Off -- 3.The 1940s -- 4.Postwar Celebrity -- Part 2 -- 5.Famous Fittings -- 6.America Comes Calling -- 7.High Society -- 8.America Again -- 9.Stage and Screen -- 10.With Cecil Beaton -- Part 3 -- 11.By Appointment -- 12.End of an Era -- 13.The Couture Houses.

Madame Paulette was Paris's queen of milliners. Born in 1900, this famed headwear designer learned her trade between the wars, and by the forties and fifties her hats crowned the heads of everyone who was anyone in Paris, and were increasingly sought by the rich and famous around the world. Film stars such as Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, and Audrey Hepburn were some of her most ardent fans, as well as royalty, including Princess Grace of Monaco and the Duchess of Windsor.Hats by Madame Paulette will appeal to fashion experts and aficionados of fine millinery alike, providing an essential guide on the most indispensable fashion item of the mid-twentieth century; no woman would consider herself formally dressed without a hat. In addition to celebrities vying for Madame Paulettes creations, fashion photographers clamored for her designs. Included here are photographs from Avedon, Newton, Horst, and Klein, as well as film stills of the hats she designed for Cecil Beaton that appeared in My Fair Lady and Gigi.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Madame Paulette's designs will be familiar to all who recall the hat Audrey -Hepburn wore to Ascot in the film My Fair Lady (1964). From the 1930s until her death in 1984, Paulette Marchand designed couture millinery for the most chic celebrities and aristocratic ladies, including Edith Piaf, Greta Garbo, and the duchess of -Windsor. Schneider is wife to the designer's son, and has drawn upon the family archives to portray a talented, supremely creative, and enterprising woman. In response to wartime fabric and gas shortages, Paulette designed her signature "turban-bicyclette," a flattering headpiece that a fashionable biking woman could use to cover her windswept hair. She designed the pillbox hat, too, decades before it was made popular by Jackie -Kennedy. By 1955 Paulette had built her international client base to 3,500, but the 1960s saw changing hair fashions and lifestyles that made hats less essential to the well-dressed woman. -VERDICT Admirers of couture fashion history will appreciate this homage that is richly illustrated with design sketches, informal family photographs, and several iconic fashion photographs by -Cecil Beaton and Richard Avedon.-Nancy B. Turner, Temple Univ. Lib., -Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Annie Schneider has spent a lifetime working in the fashion world. She is married to Madame Paulette's son.

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