Sentenced to everyday life : feminism and the housewife / Lesley Johnson and Justine Lloyd.

by Johnson, Lesley, 1949-Looking glass; Lloyd, JustineLooking glass.

Publisher: Oxford ; Berg, 2004.Description: x, 182 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1845200314; 1845200322; 9781845200312; 9781845200329.Subject(s): Feminism -- United StatesLooking glass | Housewives -- United StatesLooking glass
Contents:
Only a housewife -- Defining the housewife : contemporary feminism -- Defining the housewife : early second wave feminism -- Reviewing the 1950s -- Feminism and the subject of modernity -- Good-enough feminists? -- Whom does she represent? -- The future in her hands -- As housewives, we are worms -- The meanings of home -- At home and at work -- Dream stuff -- The housing problem -- The housewife speaks -- The importance of looking -- On the kitchen front -- The view from the kitchen window -- The three faces of Eve -- Homework and housework -- Definitions of melodrama -- Putting on the apron -- The childless housewife -- A doubled plot of femininity -- Harpies like Mildred -- Boredom : the emotional slum -- Time to burn -- Housewife's corner -- Finding time -- Declining audiences : an afterword on the housewife.
Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 163-175) and index. Review: "Drawing on research and evidence surrounding the housewife figure of the 1940s and 1950s, Johnson and Lloyd address the question of why the housewife has been such a problematic figure in feminist debates since World War II. Starting with an exploration of why the housewife of the 1940s became associated with drudgery, this book covers such topics as the ways in which magazines and advertising attempted to articulate an innate connection between women and the domestic sphere, while later films of the 1950s explored the constantly shifting boundaries between social, family and individual desires and constraints for women in the home. Johnson and Lloyd also examine how the home has been a site of boredom, and what happens to the balance between work and family in the modern world. In moving into contemporary debates, the authors explore the uneasy tension between the construction of the modern self and women's efforts to transcend the domestic sphere." "By situating their examination in a still unresolved contemporary topic, Johnson and Lloyd offer us both a backward glance and a forward-looking perspective in domesticity and the modern self."--Jacket.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan London College of Communication
Main collection
Printed books 305.4 JOH (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Issued 17/12/2021 54240936
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The history of the housewife is a complicated and uneasy narrative, rife with contradictions, tensions, and unanswered questions. In response to this, Sentenced to Everyday Life marks an important cross-generational moment in feminism. Challenging our previous understandings of what constitutes the housewife figure, this book tugs at a critical issue still unresolved in the contemporary world: what is the relationship between women and the home? And why are women so reluctant to call themselves housewives? Drawing on research and evidence surrounding the housewife figure of the 1940s and 1950s, Johnson and Lloyd address the question of why the housewife has been such a problematic figure in feminist debates since World War II. Starting with an exploration of why the housewife of the 1940s became associated with drudgery, this book covers such topics as the ways in which magazines and advertising attempted to articulate an innate connection between women and the domestic sphere, while later films of the 1950s explored the constantly shifting boundaries between social, family and individual desires and constraints for women in the home. Johnson and Lloyd also examine how the home has been a site of boredom, and what happens to the balance between work and family in the modern world. In moving into contemporary debates, the authors explore the uneasy tension between the construction of the modern self and women's efforts to transcend the domestic sphere. By situating their examination in a still unresolved contemporary topic, Johnson and Lloyd offer us both a backward glance and a forward-looking perspective into domesticity and the modern self.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 163-175) and index.

Only a housewife -- Defining the housewife : contemporary feminism -- Defining the housewife : early second wave feminism -- Reviewing the 1950s -- Feminism and the subject of modernity -- Good-enough feminists? -- Whom does she represent? -- The future in her hands -- As housewives, we are worms -- The meanings of home -- At home and at work -- Dream stuff -- The housing problem -- The housewife speaks -- The importance of looking -- On the kitchen front -- The view from the kitchen window -- The three faces of Eve -- Homework and housework -- Definitions of melodrama -- Putting on the apron -- The childless housewife -- A doubled plot of femininity -- Harpies like Mildred -- Boredom : the emotional slum -- Time to burn -- Housewife's corner -- Finding time -- Declining audiences : an afterword on the housewife.

"Drawing on research and evidence surrounding the housewife figure of the 1940s and 1950s, Johnson and Lloyd address the question of why the housewife has been such a problematic figure in feminist debates since World War II. Starting with an exploration of why the housewife of the 1940s became associated with drudgery, this book covers such topics as the ways in which magazines and advertising attempted to articulate an innate connection between women and the domestic sphere, while later films of the 1950s explored the constantly shifting boundaries between social, family and individual desires and constraints for women in the home. Johnson and Lloyd also examine how the home has been a site of boredom, and what happens to the balance between work and family in the modern world. In moving into contemporary debates, the authors explore the uneasy tension between the construction of the modern self and women's efforts to transcend the domestic sphere." "By situating their examination in a still unresolved contemporary topic, Johnson and Lloyd offer us both a backward glance and a forward-looking perspective in domesticity and the modern self."--Jacket.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • 1 'Only a Housewife'
  • Defining the Housewife: Contemporary Feminism
  • Defining the Housewife: Early Second Wave Feminism
  • Reviewing the 1950s
  • Feminism and the Subject of Modernity
  • 'Good-Enough Feminists?'
  • 2 Who Does she Represent?
  • 'The Future in her Hands'
  • 'As Housewives we are Worms'
  • The Meanings of Home
  • At Home and at Work
  • 3 Dream Stuff
  • The Housewife Speaks
  • The Importance of Looking
  • On the Kitchen Front
  • The View from the Kitchen Window
  • 4 The Three Faces of Eve
  • Homework and Housework
  • Definitions of Melodrama
  • Putting on the Apron
  • The Childless Housewife
  • A Doubled Plot of Femininity
  • Harpies Like Mildred5 Boredom: The Emotional Slum
  • 'Time to Burn'
  • Housewife's Corner
  • Finding Time
  • Declining Audiences: an Afterword on the Housewife

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dr. Lesley Johnson is the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Research) at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia.
Dr. Justine Lloyd is an Australian Postdoctoral Research Fellow from the University of Technology, Sydney.

Other editions of this work

No cover image available Sentenced to everyday life : by Johnson, Lesley ©2004
No cover image available Sentenced to everyday life : by Johnson, Lesley ©2004

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