The digital divide : the internet and social inequality in international perspective / edited by Massimo Ragnedda and Glenn W. Muschert.

by Muschert, Glenn W [editor.]Looking glass; Ragnedda, Massimo, 1976- [editor.]Looking glass.

Series: Routledge advances in sociology: ; Routledge advances in sociology: Publisher: Abingdon, Oxon, ; Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2013.Description: xx, 324 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0415525446; 9780415525442.Other title: Internet and social inequality in international perspective.Subject(s): Digital divideLooking glass | EqualityLooking glass | Information societyLooking glassNote: Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary: "This book provides an in-depth comparative analysis of inequality and the stratification of the digital sphere. Grounded in classical sociological theories of inequality, as well as empirical evidence, this book defines 'the digital divide' as the unequal access and utility of internet communications technologies and explores how it has the potential to replicate existing social inequalities, as well as create new forms of stratification. The Digital Divide examines how various demographic and socio-economic factors including income, education, age and gender, as well as infrastructure, products and services affect how the internet is used and accessed. Comprised of six parts, the first section examines theories of the digital divide, and then looks in turn at: Highly developed nations and regions (including the USA, the EU and Japan) ; Emerging large powers (Brazil, China, India, Russia) ; Eastern European countries (Estonia, Romania, Serbia) ; Arab and Middle Eastern nations (Egypt, Iran, Israel) ; Under-studied areas (East and Central Asia, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa). Providingan interwoven analysis of the international inequalities in internet usage and access, this important work offers a comprehensive approach to studying the digital divide around the globe. It is an important resource for academic and students in sociology, social policy, communication studies, media studies and all those interested in the questions and issues around social inequality."--Publisher's website.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This book provides an in-depth comparative analysis of inequality and the stratification of the digital sphere.

Grounded in classical sociological theories of inequality, as well as empirical evidence, this book defines 'the digital divide' as the unequal access and utility of internet communications technologies and explores how it has the potential to replicate existing social inequalities, as well as create new forms of stratification. The Digital Divide examines how various demographic and socio-economic factors including income, education, age and gender, as well as infrastructure, products and services affect how the internet is used and accessed. Comprised of six parts, the first section examines theories of the digital divide, and then looks in turn at:

Highly developed nations and regions (including the USA, the EU and Japan); Emerging large powers (Brazil, China, India, Russia); Eastern European countries (Estonia, Romania, Serbia); Arab and Middle Eastern nations (Egypt, Iran, Israel); Under-studied areas (East and Central Asia, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa). 

Providing an interwoven analysis of the international inequalities in internet usage and access, this important work offers a comprehensive approach to studying the digital divide around the globe. It is an important resource for academic and students in sociology, social policy, communication studies, media studies and all those interested in the questions and issues around social inequality.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"This book provides an in-depth comparative analysis of inequality and the stratification of the digital sphere. Grounded in classical sociological theories of inequality, as well as empirical evidence, this book defines 'the digital divide' as the unequal access and utility of internet communications technologies and explores how it has the potential to replicate existing social inequalities, as well as create new forms of stratification. The Digital Divide examines how various demographic and socio-economic factors including income, education, age and gender, as well as infrastructure, products and services affect how the internet is used and accessed. Comprised of six parts, the first section examines theories of the digital divide, and then looks in turn at: Highly developed nations and regions (including the USA, the EU and Japan) ; Emerging large powers (Brazil, China, India, Russia) ; Eastern European countries (Estonia, Romania, Serbia) ; Arab and Middle Eastern nations (Egypt, Iran, Israel) ; Under-studied areas (East and Central Asia, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa). Providingan interwoven analysis of the international inequalities in internet usage and access, this important work offers a comprehensive approach to studying the digital divide around the globe. It is an important resource for academic and students in sociology, social policy, communication studies, media studies and all those interested in the questions and issues around social inequality."--Publisher's website.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction
  • 1 Theorizing Community without Propinquity and Inequality in the Internet Age: An Examination of How the Work of Classical and Contemporary Theories on Community, Inequality, and Place Help Us Understand Inequality in the Information Age
  • Part I The Digital Divide in Developed Countries (EU, US and Japan)
  • Introduction
  • 2 The Digital Divide in Europe
  • 3 The Digital Divide in the US
  • 4 The Digital Divide in Japan
  • Part II The Digital Divide in Rapidly Emerging Countries (China, Brazil, Russia, and India)
  • Introduction
  • 5 The Digital Divide in Asia: The Barriers of First Order and Second Order Digital Divide
  • 6 The Use of Internet by Brazilian Urban Poor
  • 7 The Digital Divide in India
  • 8 The Digital Divide in Russia
  • Part III The Digital Divide in Eastern Europe
  • Introduction
  • 9 The Role of the Social Media and the Network Literacies: The Internet and Social Inequality in Serbia
  • 10 Closing the Gap, are we there yet? Reflections on the Persistence of Second-level Digital Divide Among Children in Central and Eastern Europe
  • 11 Behind the Slogan of 'Digital Nation': Taking a Closer Look at Estonia
  • Part IV The Digital Divide in the Middle East/North Africa
  • Introduction
  • 12 Digital Inequality and Revolution in the Arab World
  • 13 Ethno-National Gaps in Access and Use of the Internet in Israel
  • 14 Analytical Aspects of Second-level Digital Divide in Iran: A Case Study of the University of Tehran's Undergraduate Students
  • Part V The Digital Divide in the Under-studied Countries
  • Introduction
  • 15 Incorporating Digital Technologies into Education as a Critical Opportunity in the Battle for Equity in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • 16 Unequal Adoption, Appropriation and Use of Computers and the Internet in Niger
  • 17 Neoliberalism, Telecommunications Deregulation, and the Digital Divide
  • 18 The Double Digital Divide and Social Inequality in Asia: Comparative Research on Internet Cafes in Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, and the Philippines
  • Conclusion

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This collection engages traditional measures of social stratification to analyze digital divides in international perspective. Chapters include studies of the US, Europe broadly, individual countries, and subregions (disaggregating Europe), and range from a study of student skill differences (the second-level digital divide) within the University of Tehran to regional studies of Latin America and Central Asia, and intraregional comparisons, such as between Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, and the Philippines. The volume takes a nuanced look at the digital divide as more than access to information and communication technologies (ICTs), with consideration of digital skills, access to information, and the ability to enter labor markets facilitated by ICTs. Africa is completely understudied, with a single chapter on the nation of Niger. Not all of the studies equally engage the theoretical motivations of the book by application of classical sociological theories such as those of Marx, Durkheim, or Weber, nor do they all present their statistical findings with clarity, nor equally (or critically) consider causality. Without a clear vision of causality, policy recommendations can be misguided, at best. Extremely valuable, but indicating the relative infancy of serious scholarship on ICTs. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. L. Croissant University of Arizona

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Massimo Ragnedda teaches Mass Communications at Northumbria University, UK. Previously he was an affiliated visitor at the Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge, UK and in 2011 he was Academic Visiting at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, UK.

Glenn W. Muschert is Associate Professor in the Sociology, Criminology, and Social Justice Studies Programs at Miami University, USA.

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