Science in action : how to follow scientists and engineers through society / Bruno Latour.

by Latour, BrunoLooking glass.

Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1987.Description: viii, 274 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0674792904; 0674792912; 9780674792906; 9780674792913.Subject(s): Science -- HistoryLooking glass | Science -- PhilosophyLooking glass | Science -- Social aspectsLooking glass | Technology -- Social aspectsLooking glass
Contents:
Introduction: Opening Pandora's black box -- pt. I: From weaker to stronger rhetoric. Literature ; Laboratories -- pt. II: From weak points to strongholds. Machines ; Insiders out -- pt. III: From short to longer networks. Tribunals of reason ; Centres of calculation -- Appendix 1: Rules of method -- Appendix 2: Principles.
Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 266-270) and index.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan Camberwell College of Arts
Main collection
Printed books 306.45 LAT (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54183292
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 266-270) and index.

Introduction: Opening Pandora's black box -- pt. I: From weaker to stronger rhetoric. Literature ; Laboratories -- pt. II: From weak points to strongholds. Machines ; Insiders out -- pt. III: From short to longer networks. Tribunals of reason ; Centres of calculation -- Appendix 1: Rules of method -- Appendix 2: Principles.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Not in any sense a lofty Popperian or Kuhnian treatise on the ultimate nature of science, Latour's book rather presents the technoscientific beast going about its gritty daily rounds-the time while the rough-hewn, sought-after paradigm is taking shape, when rhetoric, obscurantist calculations, authority, and money determine more than anything else (according to Latour) what is-and who is doing-``science.'' Such, then, is the sociology of science; and most scientists would perhaps painfully acknowledge the sad fate in the practical world of their revered instrument of truth that Latour devastatingly, deconstructively portrays. But when the author goes on to argue that ``Still more fragile than termites, {{scientific}} facts ... cannot survive one minute in ... {{the}} mythical `out-thereness' so vaunted by philosophers of science,'' he is claiming that all there is to science is sociology, and the case falters by its one-sidedness. Still, Latour is a witty, provocative, imaginative writer, and the theoretical framework of his book, which posits seven rules of method and six principles to deal with science in the making, itself constitutes an impressive contribution to scientific objectivity. Highly recommended for college and university libraries.-M. Schiff, College of Staten Island, CUNY

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Bruno LaTour was born in the French province of Burgundy, where his family has been making wine for many generations. He was educated in Dijon, where he studied philosophy and Biblical exegesis. He then went to Africa, to complete his military service, working for a French organization similar to the American Peace Corps. While in Africa he became interested in the social sciences, particularly anthropology.

LaTour believes that through his interests in philosophy, theology, and anthropology, he is actually pursuing a single goal, to understand the different ways that truth is built. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, LaTour has written about the philosophy and sociology of science in an original, insightful, and sometimes quirky way. Works that have been translated to English include The Pasteurization of France; Laboratory Life; Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers through Society; We Have Never Been Modern; and Aramis, or the Love of Technology.

LaTour is a professor at the Center for the Sociology of Innovation, a division of the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, in Paris.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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