Benjamin, Barthes, and the singularity of photography / Kathrin Yacavone.

by Yacavone, KathrinLooking glass.

Publisher: New York, N.Y. ; Continuum, [2012]Description: xiii, 247 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 24 cm.ISBN: 144111808X; 9781441118080.Subject(s): Barthes, RolandLooking glass | Benjamin, Walter, 1892-1940Looking glass | Photographic criticismLooking glass | Photography -- HistoryLooking glass | Photography -- PhilosophyLooking glass
Contents:
Benjamin and Barthes: the question of influence -- Benjamin's history of photography -- Alter ego: the chilhood portrait of Franz Kafka -- Photography, memory and redemption -- From semiology to phenomenology -- Lost and found: the Winter Garden photograph -- Photography and memory: Barthes's Proustian quest -- Singularity and photography in the age of digitization.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary: "A comparative study of Benjamin's and Barthes's writings on photography in the context of photographic history and twentieth-century critical and theoretical discourses"--Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: International Women's day
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan London College of Communication
Main collection
Printed books 770.1 YAC (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Issued 26/10/2021 54165725
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Benjamin, Barthes and the Singularity of Photography presents two of the most important intellectual figures of the twentieth century in a new comparative light. Pursuing hitherto unexplored aspects of Benjamin's and Barthes's engagement with photography, it provides new interpretations of familiar texts and analyzes material which has only recently become available. It argues that despite the different historical, philosophical and cultural contexts of their work, Benjamin and Barthes engage with similar issues and problems that photography uniquely poses, including the relationship between the photograph and its beholder as a confrontation between self and other, and the dynamic relation between time, subjectivity, memory and loss. Each writer emphasizes the singular event of the photograph's apprehension and its ethical and existential aspects rooted in the power and poignancy of photographic images. Mapping the complex relationship between photographic history and theory, cultural criticism and autobiography, this book will be of considerable interest not only to historians and theorists of photography but also to scholars working in literary and cultural studies.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Benjamin and Barthes: the question of influence -- Benjamin's history of photography -- Alter ego: the chilhood portrait of Franz Kafka -- Photography, memory and redemption -- From semiology to phenomenology -- Lost and found: the Winter Garden photograph -- Photography and memory: Barthes's Proustian quest -- Singularity and photography in the age of digitization.

"A comparative study of Benjamin's and Barthes's writings on photography in the context of photographic history and twentieth-century critical and theoretical discourses"--Provided by publisher.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowledgements (p. viii)
  • List of Abbreviations (p. x)
  • List of Illustrations (p. xii)
  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • Benjamin and Barthes: The Question of Influence (p. 13)
  • Part I The Birth of the Viewer (p. 29)
  • Chapter 1 Benjamin's History of Photography (p. 33)
  • Chapter 2 Alter Ego: The Childhood Portrait of Franz Kafka (p. 70)
  • Chapter 3 Photography, Memory and Redemption (p. 95)
  • Part II Photography and Subjectivity (p. 121)
  • Chapter 4 From Semiology to Phenomenology (p. 125)
  • Chapter 5 Lost and Found: The Winter Garden Photograph (p. 161)
  • Chapter 6 Photography and Memory: Barthes's Proustian Quest (p. 187)
  • Postscript: Singularity and Photography in the Age of Digitization (p. 217)
  • Bibliography (p. 227)
  • Index (p. 241)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kathrin Yacavone teaches in the Department of French and Francophone Studies at the University of Nottingham, UK.

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