Reuse value [electronic resource] : spolia and appropriation in art and architecture, from Constantine to Sherrie Levine / edited by Richard Brilliant and Dale Kinney.

by Brilliant, RichardLooking glass; Kinney, DaleLooking glass; ProQuest (Firm) [supplier.]Looking glass; EBSCO Publishing (Firm) [supplier.]Looking glass.

Publisher: Farnham : Ashgate, 2011.Description: [xv], 268 pages : illustrations.ISBN: 1409435180; 9781409435181.Subject(s): Appropriation (Art) -- Case studies | Appropriation (Art) -- History | Building materials -- Recycling -- Case studies | Building materials -- Recycling -- History | Classical antiquities -- Destruction and pillageLooking glass | Electronic booksLooking glass
Contents:
Introduction / Dale Kinney -- On the reuse of antiquity : the perspectives of the archaeologist and of the historian / Arnold Esch -- Reading spolia in late antiquity and contemporary perception / Paolo Liverani -- The use of older elements in the architecture of fourth-and fifth-century Rome : a contribution to the evaluation of spolia / Hugo Brandenburg -- Spolia : a definition in ruins / Michael Greenhalgh -- Ancient gems in the Middle Ages : riches and ready-mades / Dale Kinney -- Appropriation as inscription : making history in the first Friday Mosque of Delhi Finbarr / Barry Flood -- Renaissance spolia and Renaissance antiquity (one neighborhood, three cases) / Michael Koortbojian -- Authenticity and alienation / Richard Brilliant -- The building's body : spolia as supplement, substitution, destruction / Annabel J. Wharton -- A medieval monument and its modern myths of iconoclasm : the enduring contestations over the Qutb Complex in Delhi / Mrinalini Rajagopalan -- Spolia in contemporary architecture : searching for ornament and place / Hans-Rudolf Meier -- Some thoughts about the significance of postmodern appropriation art / Donald Kuspit -- Epilogue / Richard Brilliant.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Alternative form: 9781409424222Online access: EBSCOhost Read this e-book from EBSCO
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This book offers a range of views on spolia and appropriation in art and architecture from fourth-century Rome to the late twentieth century. Using case studies from different historical moments and cultures, contributors test the limits of spolia as a critical category and seek to define its specific character in relation to other forms of artistic appropriation. Several authors explore the ethical issues raised by spoliation and their implications for the evaluation and interpretation of new work made with spolia.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction / Dale Kinney -- On the reuse of antiquity : the perspectives of the archaeologist and of the historian / Arnold Esch -- Reading spolia in late antiquity and contemporary perception / Paolo Liverani -- The use of older elements in the architecture of fourth-and fifth-century Rome : a contribution to the evaluation of spolia / Hugo Brandenburg -- Spolia : a definition in ruins / Michael Greenhalgh -- Ancient gems in the Middle Ages : riches and ready-mades / Dale Kinney -- Appropriation as inscription : making history in the first Friday Mosque of Delhi Finbarr / Barry Flood -- Renaissance spolia and Renaissance antiquity (one neighborhood, three cases) / Michael Koortbojian -- Authenticity and alienation / Richard Brilliant -- The building's body : spolia as supplement, substitution, destruction / Annabel J. Wharton -- A medieval monument and its modern myths of iconoclasm : the enduring contestations over the Qutb Complex in Delhi / Mrinalini Rajagopalan -- Spolia in contemporary architecture : searching for ornament and place / Hans-Rudolf Meier -- Some thoughts about the significance of postmodern appropriation art / Donald Kuspit -- Epilogue / Richard Brilliant.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This thought-provoking collection of essays by 12 archaeologists and art historians considers spolia of different types: columns and other architectural elements, architectural sculptures, gems, inscriptions, paintings, and photographs. The unifying characteristic of spolia is that they have been reused in another context, whether the reused components are the original pieces or images of them. This volume examines art and architecture from late antiquity through the 20th century, from Europe, India, and the US. Throughout, it raises questions as to why spolia were incorporated into later architecture and art, and what they signified--in particular whether they carried any of their original meaning with them. The essays often exhibit the bias of a negative response to the last question. For example, Hugo Brandenburg claims that the reused architectural sculptures from the Arch of Constantine only "could in a general sense denote the world of the ruler and the victorious imperium of Constantine." Yet the recarving of the protagonists' heads as portraits of Constantine suggests instead that Constantine wanted to be viewed in earlier rulers' specific roles, such as a courageous hunter on the Hadrianic roundels. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates through researchers/faculty; general readers. F. Van Keuren emerita, University of Georgia

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