Gameplay mode : war, simulation, and technoculture / Patrick Crogan.

by Crogan, Patrick [author.]Looking glass.

Series: Electronic mediations: Publisher: Minneapolis, Minnesota : University of Minnesota Press, [2011]Description: xxvii, 222 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780816653348; 0816653348; 9780816653355; 0816653356.Subject(s): Computer flight gamesLooking glass | Computer games -- Social aspectsLooking glass | Computer war gamesLooking glass | Video games -- Social aspectsLooking glass
Contents:
Introduction: Technology, War, and Simulation -- 1. From the Military-Industrial to the Military-Entertainment Complex -- 2. Select Gameplay Mode: Simulation, Criticality, and the Chance of Videogames -- 3. Logistical Space: Flight Simulators and the Animation of Virtual Reality -- 4. Military Gametime: History, Narrative, and Temporality in Cinema and Games -- 5. The Game of Life: Experiences of the First-Person Shooter -- 6. Other Players in Other Spaces: War and Online Games -- 7. Playing Through: The Future of Alternative and Critical Game Projects -- Conclusion: The Challenge of Simulation.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary: "From flight simulators and first-person shooters to MMPOG and innovative strategy games like 2008's Spore, computer games owe their development to computer simulation and imaging produced by and for the military during the Cold War. To understand their place in contemporary culture, Patrick Crogan argues, we must first understand the military logics that created and continue to inform them. Gameplay Mode situates computer games and gaming within the contemporary technocultural moment, connecting them to developments in the conceptualization of pure war since the Second World War and the evolution of simulation as both a technological achievement and a sociopolitical tool.Crogan begins by locating the origins of computer games in the development of cybernetic weapons systems in the 1940s, the U.S. Air Force's attempt to use computer simulation to protect the country against nuclear attack, and the U.S. military's development of the SIMNET simulated battlefield network in the late 1980s. He then examines specific game modes and genres in detail, from the creation of virtual space in fight simulation games and the co-option of narrative forms in gameplay to the continuities between online gaming sociality and real-world communities and the potential of experimental or artgame projects like September 12th: A Toy World and Painstation, to critique conventional computer games.Drawing on critical theoretical perspectives on computer-based technoculture, Crogan reveals the profound extent to which today's computer games--and the wider culture they increasingly influence--are informed by the technoscientific program they inherited from the military-industrial complex. But, Crogan concludes, games can play with, as well as play out, their underlying logic, offering the potential for computer gaming to anticipate a different, more peaceful and hopeful future"-- Provided by publisher.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan Chelsea College of Arts
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Printed books 793.932 CRO (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54156164
Long loan London College of Communication
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From flight simulators and first-person shooters to MMPOG and innovative strategy games like 2008's Spore , computer games owe their development to computer simulation and imaging produced by and for the military during the Cold War. To understand their place in contemporary culture, Patrick Crogan argues, we must first understand the military logics that created and continue to inform them. Gameplay Mode situates computer games and gaming within the contemporary technocultural moment, connecting them to developments in the conceptualization of pure war since the Second World War and the evolution of simulation as both a technological achievement and a sociopolitical tool.

Crogan begins by locating the origins of computer games in the development of cybernetic weapons systems in the 1940s, the U.S. Air Force's attempt to use computer simulation to protect the country against nuclear attack, and the U.S. military's development of the SIMNET simulated battlefield network in the late 1980s. He then examines specific game modes and genres in detail, from the creation of virtual space in fight simulation games and the co-option of narrative forms in gameplay to the continuities between online gaming sociality and real-world communities and the potential of experimental or artgame projects like September 12th: A Toy World and Painstation, to critique conventional computer games.

Drawing on critical theoretical perspectives on computer-based technoculture, Crogan reveals the profound extent to which today's computer games--and the wider culture they increasingly influence--are informed by the technoscientific program they inherited from the military-industrial complex. But, Crogan concludes, games can play with, as well as play out, their underlying logic, offering the potential for computer gaming to anticipate a different, more peaceful and hopeful future.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Technology, War, and Simulation -- 1. From the Military-Industrial to the Military-Entertainment Complex -- 2. Select Gameplay Mode: Simulation, Criticality, and the Chance of Videogames -- 3. Logistical Space: Flight Simulators and the Animation of Virtual Reality -- 4. Military Gametime: History, Narrative, and Temporality in Cinema and Games -- 5. The Game of Life: Experiences of the First-Person Shooter -- 6. Other Players in Other Spaces: War and Online Games -- 7. Playing Through: The Future of Alternative and Critical Game Projects -- Conclusion: The Challenge of Simulation.

"From flight simulators and first-person shooters to MMPOG and innovative strategy games like 2008's Spore, computer games owe their development to computer simulation and imaging produced by and for the military during the Cold War. To understand their place in contemporary culture, Patrick Crogan argues, we must first understand the military logics that created and continue to inform them. Gameplay Mode situates computer games and gaming within the contemporary technocultural moment, connecting them to developments in the conceptualization of pure war since the Second World War and the evolution of simulation as both a technological achievement and a sociopolitical tool.Crogan begins by locating the origins of computer games in the development of cybernetic weapons systems in the 1940s, the U.S. Air Force's attempt to use computer simulation to protect the country against nuclear attack, and the U.S. military's development of the SIMNET simulated battlefield network in the late 1980s. He then examines specific game modes and genres in detail, from the creation of virtual space in fight simulation games and the co-option of narrative forms in gameplay to the continuities between online gaming sociality and real-world communities and the potential of experimental or artgame projects like September 12th: A Toy World and Painstation, to critique conventional computer games.Drawing on critical theoretical perspectives on computer-based technoculture, Crogan reveals the profound extent to which today's computer games--and the wider culture they increasingly influence--are informed by the technoscientific program they inherited from the military-industrial complex. But, Crogan concludes, games can play with, as well as play out, their underlying logic, offering the potential for computer gaming to anticipate a different, more peaceful and hopeful future"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This exhaustively researched volume provides an overview of critical analyses of computer games to date, but makes the case that none of these have adequately accounted for the fact that computer games were imagined, constructed, and permanently shaped by the military/technoscientific crucible in which they were born. Crogan (film and media studies, Univ. of the West of England, Bristol) asserts that computer gaming can neither escape from nor be considered separately from its original purpose: to enable and facilitate the military's desire to achieve a state of "pure war" that accurately simulates and controls situations and actors. This argument is supported by extensive documentation of the symbiotic relationship between the military and the entertainment industry. According to Crogan, they work together to forge and normalize a vision of the future that is created, disseminated, and acted out through the medium of simulations such as war training tutorials, video games, and drone missions. The author's tone is frequently dismissive of others' work and allows little room for alternative visions of either the past or future of computer-based play. However, his arguments are thought-provoking, well supported, and engaging. The book is an important contribution to the literature of game studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals/practitioners. E. Bertozzi Long Island University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Patrick Crogan teaches film and media studies at the University of the West of England, Bristol.

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