Mapping strategic diversity : strategic thinking from a variety of perspectives / Dany Jacobs.

by Jacobs, D. (Dany)Looking glass.

Publisher: London : Routledge, 2010.Description: xviii, 238 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780415550246; 0415550246; 9780415550239; 0415550238.Subject(s): Strategic planningLooking glass | ManagementLooking glassNote: Bibliography: pages 221-229. - Includes index.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In his influential work, Strategy Safari, Henry Mintzberg and his colleagues presented ten schools of strategic thought. In this impressive book, Dany Jacobs demonstrates that the real world of strategic management is much wider and richer. 

In Mapping Strategic Diversity, Jacobs distinguishes between 'cockpit theories' of strategy, which bring rational analysis to the forefront, and process-oriented social science approaches, which bring in a wider array of influences to the theory and practice of business planning. Presenting 22 different approaches to strategy making, this book:

provides a comprehensive overview of the field guides the reader in developing theoretical and practical skills helps develop both high and low level strategic thinking

This textbook is a useful analysis for practising managers, but really comes into its own as an advanced introduction to the field of strategic management; having read this book, students are fully armed to enter the strategy jungle!

Bibliography: pages 221-229. - Includes index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of figures and tables (p. x)
  • Preface (p. xii)
  • 1 The essence of strategy: key components (p. 1)
  • 1.1 What do you know about strategy? What do you think about it? (p. 1)
  • 1.2 What are we talking about when we discuss strategy? (p. 2)
  • 1.3 How important is strategy? (p. 6)
  • 1.4 Basic components of strategy? (p. 10)
  • 1.5 Strategy and organizational levels (p. 15)
  • 1.6 Prescriptive and descriptive strategy approaches (p. 17)
  • 1.7 'Tame' and 'wicked' problems (p. 24)
  • 1.8 The score so far (p. 29)
  • 2 Some traditional strategy typologies (p. 30)
  • 2.1 Introduction (p. 30)
  • 2.2 Porter: cost versus added value (p. 30)
  • 2.3 Innovativeness: Miles and Snow (p. 35)
  • 2.4 Ansoff and others: development trajectories for large corporations (p. 36)
  • 2.5 Miller and Friesen: archetypes of strategy-making (p. 38)
  • 2.6 Strategy: long live diversity! (p. 40)
  • 3 30 Ps for perspectives on strategy: toward strategic-style flexibility (p. 41)
  • 3.1 How many Ps can you think of? (p. 41)
  • 3.2 Perspectives and the case for style flexibility (p. 42)
  • 3.3 Strategy as a Plan or Programme (p. 44)
  • 3.4 Strategy as a Pattern or Path (p. 44)
  • 3.5 Strategy as a Position (p. 45)
  • 3.6 Strategy as a Perspective, Personality, Profile, Paradigm and Perception (p. 46)
  • 3.7 Strategy as a Ploy and a Principle (p. 47)
  • 3.8 From 15 to more than 30 Ps (p. 50)
  • 3.9 Summary and synthesis of the first three chapters (p. 52)
  • Appendix: avoid the frontal attack! What managers can learn from the military (p. 53)
  • 4 The strategy forest (p. 59)
  • 4.1 What do you know about it? What do you think of it? (p. 59)
  • 4.2 The (bounded) rationality of strategy (p. 60)
  • 4.3 'Splitters' and 'lumpers' (p. 63)
  • 4.4 Four groups of strategy schools (p. 65)
  • 4.5 The first maps of the strategy forest (p. 70)
  • 5 Where there's a will, there's a way: all-powerful optimists (p. 72)
  • 5.1 Eight schools (p. 72)
  • 5.2 The design school (p. 73)
  • 5.3 The entrepreneurial or vision school (p. 76)
  • 5.4 The planning school (p. 78)
  • 5.5 The positioning or I0 school (p. 84)
  • 5.6 The portfolio approach (p. 87)
  • 5.7 The resource-based and competence-based approaches (p. 91)
  • 5.8 The resource-dependence or stakeholder approach (p. 97)
  • 5.9 The configuration school (p. 100)
  • 5.10 Many roads to excellence (p. 103)
  • 6 The entrepreneur deliberates, the market decides: cautious optimists (p. 106)
  • 6.1 Four schools (p. 106)
  • 6.2 The transaction-cost approach (and related economic theories) (p. 107)
  • 6.3 Game theory (p. 114)
  • 6.4 The evolutionary school (p. 121)
  • 6.5 The guerrilla approach (p. 129)
  • 6.6 They're big and we're small-and that's not fair (p. 131)
  • 7 That's the way we see it, that's the way we do it: framed rationality (p. 134)
  • 7.1 Four schools (p. 134)
  • 7.2 The critical school (p. 135)
  • 7.3 Postmodernism (p. 137)
  • 7.4 The cognitive school (p. 139)
  • 7.5 The cultural school (p. 142)
  • 7.6 Strong thoughts and routines (p. 145)
  • 8 Everything flows: interactive players (p. 147)
  • 8.1 Six schools (p. 147)
  • 8.2 The learning school (p. 149)
  • 8.3 The political school (p. 153)
  • 8.4 The identity approach (p. 157)
  • 8.5 Systems dynamics (p. 161)
  • 8.6 Social constructivism (p. 164)
  • 8.7 Complexity and co-evolution (p. 173)
  • 8.8 Strategy never ends (p. 183)
  • 9 The second atlas of the forest (p. 186)
  • 9.1 Back to the bigger picture (p. 186)
  • 9.2 All the perspectives in one map (p. 186)
  • 9.3 Strategy in practice: the strategic prayer wheel revisited (p. 191)
  • 9.4 On to the paradoxes (p. 196)
  • 10 Gusts at the top of the Pico Paradox (p. 197)
  • 10.1 Why are paradoxes strategically important? (p. 197)
  • 10.2 What is a paradox? (p. 198)
  • 10.3 The danger of denying paradoxes (p. 199)
  • 10.4 Dealing with ambiguity (p. 201)
  • 10.5 Steering and self-organization (p. 201)
  • 10.6 Hybrid 'solutions' (p. 204)
  • 10.7 Paradoxes relating to the internal context (p. 206)
  • 10.8 Paradoxes relating to the external context (p. 208)
  • 10.9 Paradoxes relating to the strategy-making process (p. 210)
  • 10.10 Paradoxes relating to content (p. 211)
  • Notes (p. 214)
  • Bibliography (p. 221)
  • Index (p. 230)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dany Jacobs is Professor of Industrial Dynamics and Innovation Policy at the University of Amsterdam and Professor of Art, Culture and Economy at the Universities of Applied Science ArtEZ and HAN in Arnhem, The Netherlands. He has been active in the field of innovation for more than 20 years.

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