Ethics in cyberspace : how cyberspace may influence interpersonal interaction / Thomas Ploug.

by Ploug, ThomasLooking glass.

Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, [2009]Description: ix, 223 pages : illustrations (some colour) ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9048123690; 9048123704 (e-book); 9789048123698; 9789048123704 (e-book).Subject(s): Internet -- Moral and ethical aspectsLooking glass | Interpersonal relationsLooking glassNote: Includes bibliographical references and index.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Over the last few decades information and communication technology has come to play an increasingly prominent role in our dealings with other people. Computers, in particular, have made available a host of new ways of interacting, which we have increasingly made use of. In the wake of this development a number of ethical questions have been raised and debated. Ethics in Cyberspace focuses on the consequences for ethical agency of mediating interaction by means of computers, seeking to clarify how the conditions of certain kinds of interaction in cyberspace (for example, in chat-rooms and virtual worlds) differ from the conditions of interaction face-to-face and how these differences may come to affect the behaviour of interacting agents in terms of ethics.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface
  • I The basic premise
  • 1 Ethics in Cyberspace
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.1.1 The Face of the Other
  • 1.1.2 The 'Legal Tender' experiment
  • 1.1.3 Explaining the basic premise
  • 1.1.4 Road-map
  • 2 The basic premise revisited
  • 2.1 Shortcomings of the basic premise
  • 2.1.1 The kind of mediation
  • 2.1.2 The character of actions contrasted
  • 2.1.3 Coincidental difference in interaction
  • 2.1.4 Qualitative identity of situations
  • 2.2 The basic premise
  • 2.2.1 Restating the basic premise
  • 2.2.2 Exploration of the basic premise
  • II Action, explanation and cyberspace
  • 3 Actions and explanations
  • 3.1 Actions and reasons
  • 3.1.1 'The moral problem'
  • 3.1.2 A Humean theory of motivation
  • 3.1.3 Internalism in relation to normative reasons
  • 3.1.4 Pure cognitivist internalism
  • 3.2 Explaining the basic premise
  • 3.2.1 The role of beliefs in explanation
  • 3.2.2 The role of ontological conditions in explanation
  • 3.2.3 Explanatory model
  • 4 Interaction in Cyberspace
  • 4.1 Cyberspace | Infrastructure and interaction
  • 4.1.1 Conceptual computers and digital electronic machines
  • 4.1.2 Defining Cyberspace | virtuality and interaction
  • 4.1.3 Specific kinds of interaction in Cyberspace
  • 4.2 Key properties of cyberspatial interaction
  • 4.2.1 Limited exchange of data and information
  • 4.2.2 Limited sensory access
  • 4.2.3 Extensive anonymity
  • 4.2.4 Logical relationship between key properties
  • III Explaining the basic premise
  • 5 Belief and particularity
  • 5.1 Structure of analysis
  • 5.2 The three hypotheses
  • 5.2.1 Being convinced to a certain extent
  • 5.2.2 The reality of the patient
  • 5.2.3 Reliable and relevant evidence
  • 6 Belief and reality
  • 6.1 Hypothesis I | Reality and determinateness
  • 6.1.1 Determinateness and determinedness
  • 6.1.2 Belief, reality and determinateness
  • 6.2 Hypothesis II | Reality, causality and life-world
  • 6.2.1 Causality and life-world
  • 6.2.2 Belief, reality and causality
  • 6.2.3 Belief, reality and life-world
  • 6.3 Hypothesis III | Reality and vulnerability
  • 6.3.1 Vulnerability and dependency
  • 6.3.2 Belief, reality and vulnerability
  • 6.4 Hypotheses I-III | Beliefs and evidence
  • 6.4.1 Linking beliefs and evidence
  • 7 Belief and evidence
  • 7.1 Evidence in cyberspatial interaction
  • 7.1.1 Lack of evidence
  • 7.1.2 Lack of relevant evidence
  • 7.1.3 Lack of reliable evidence
  • 8 Belief and action
  • 8.1 Belief, reality and ethics
  • 8.1.1 Belief, reality and motivation
  • 8.1.2 The particularity of moral concern
  • 8.2 Explaining the moral difference in interaction
  • 8.2.1 Foundation for explaining
  • 8.2.2 Explaining
  • 8.2.3 Revisiting sources of inspiration
  • 9 A few concluding comments
  • 9.1 Alternative explanations and interpretations
  • Bibliography

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