Hair raising : beauty, culture and African American women / Noliwe M. Rooks.

by Rooks, Noliwe, 1963-Looking glass.

Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. ; Rutgers University Press, [1996]Description: xiii, 160 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780813523125; 0813523117; 9780813523118; 0813523125.Other title: Beauty, culture and African American women.Subject(s): Hairdressing of African Americans -- History | Beauty culture -- United States -- History | African American women -- HistoryLooking glass
Contents:
Nappi by nature: afros, hot combs, and black pride -- Beauty, race, and black pride -- Advertising contradictions -- Broadening representational boundaries -- Gender, hair, and African American women's magazines -- In search of connections.
Note: Bibliography: pages 149-156. - Includes index.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan London College of Fashion
Main collection
Printed books 305.48896 ROO (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54136866
Long loan London College of Fashion
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Printed books 305.48896 ROO (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54180938
Long loan London College of Fashion
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Printed books 305.48896 ROO (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54180697
Long loan London College of Fashion
Main collection
Printed books 305.48896 ROO (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54180698
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

We all know there is a politics of skin color, but is there a politics of hair?In this book, Noliwe Rooks explores the history and politics of hair and beauty culture in African American communities from the nineteenth century to the 1990s. She discusses the ways in which African American women have located themselves in their own families, communities, and national culture through beauty advertisements, treatments, and styles. Bringing the story into today's beauty shop, listening to other women talk about braids, Afros, straighteners, and what they mean today to grandmothers, mothers, sisters, friends, and boyfriends, she also talks about her own family and has fun along the way. Hair Raising is that rare sort of book that manages both to entertain and to illuminate its subject.

Bibliography: pages 149-156. - Includes index.

Nappi by nature: afros, hot combs, and black pride -- Beauty, race, and black pride -- Advertising contradictions -- Broadening representational boundaries -- Gender, hair, and African American women's magazines -- In search of connections.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Rooks's excellent book is a welcome entry in the feminist debates about American "beauty culture." In her "attempt to unravel the tangled meaning of hair in African American women's lives," Rooks (English, Univ. of Missouri) takes a cultural-studies approach to the history of hair-straightening products in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She closely examines advertisements for such products, looking at how African American women were portrayed and how they portrayed themselves in ads for product lines they owned. She also studies African American women's magazines to trace connections between hairstyling and gender. The book's broader project is "to discuss the politics of representation as it relates to the construction of an African American female identity and various positions surrounding the meaning of African American women's bodies in a broad social context." Concluding with a consideration of contemporary "hair politics," the book addresses the significant gap in the treatment of this subject by such feminist scholars as Naomi Wolf (The Beauty Myth, CH, Jan'92), Susan Brownmiller (Femininity, 1984), and Lois Banner (American Beauty, CH, Jul'83). Readable, accessible, and helpfully illustrated, this volume is a crucial addition to any library's collection. R. R. Warhol University of Vermont

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Noliwe M. Rooks is an assistant professor of English and the coordinator of African American Studies at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. She was the associate editor of Paris Connections: African American Artists in Paris , winner of a 1993 American Book Award .

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