Is there anything good about men? : how cultures flourish by exploiting men / Roy F. Baumeister.

by Baumeister, Roy FLooking glass.

Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010.Description: viii, 306 pages ; 25 cm.ISBN: 019537410X; 9780195374100.Subject(s): EqualityLooking glass | Men in popular cultureLooking glass | MenLooking glass | WomenLooking glass | Sex differences (Psychology)Looking glass | Sex roleLooking glass
Contents:
An odd, unseasonal question -- Are women better than men, or vice versa? -- Can't or wont? Where the real differences are found -- The most underappreciated fact about men -- Are women more social? -- How culture works -- Women, men, and culture : the roots of inequality -- Expendable beings, disposable lives -- Earning manhood, and the male ego -- Exploiting men through marriage and sex -- What else, what next?
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan Central Saint Martins
Main collection
Printed books 305.31 BAU (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54134008
Long loan London College of Communication
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Printed books 305.31 BAU (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54148331
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Have men really been engaged in a centuries-old conspiracy to exploit and oppress women? Have the essential differences between men and women really been erased? Have men now become unnecessary? Are they good for anything at all?

In Is There Anything Good About Men?, Roy Baumeister offers provocative answers to these and many other questions about the current state of manhood in America. Baumeister argues that relations between men and women are now and have always been more cooperative than antagonistic, that men and women
are different in basic ways, and that successful cultures capitalize on these differences to outperform rival cultures. Amongst our ancestors---as with many other species--only the alpha males were able to reproduce, leading them to take more risks and to exhibit more aggressive and protective
behaviors than women, whose evolutionary strategies required a different set of behaviors. Whereas women favor and excel at one-to-one intimate relationships, men compete with one another and build larger organizations and social networks from which culture grows. But cultures in turn exploit men by
insisting that their role is to achieve and produce, to provide for others, and if necessary to sacrifice themselves. Baumeister shows that while men have greatly benefited from the culture they have created, they have also suffered because of it. Men may dominate the upper echelons of business and
politics, but far more men than women die in work-related accidents, are incarcerated, or are killed in battle--facts nearly always left out of current gender debates.

Engagingly written, brilliantly argued, and based on evidence from a wide range of disciplines, Is There Anything Good About Men? offers a new and far more balanced view of gender relations.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

An odd, unseasonal question -- Are women better than men, or vice versa? -- Can't or wont? Where the real differences are found -- The most underappreciated fact about men -- Are women more social? -- How culture works -- Women, men, and culture : the roots of inequality -- Expendable beings, disposable lives -- Earning manhood, and the male ego -- Exploiting men through marriage and sex -- What else, what next?

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Chapter 1 An Odd, Unseasonal Question (p. 3)
  • Chapter 2 Are Women Better than Men, or Vice Versa? (p. 23)
  • Chapter 3 Can't or Won't? Where the Real Differences Are Found (p. 43)
  • Chapter 4 The Most Underappreciated Fact About Men (p. 61)
  • Chapter 5 Are Women More Social? (p. 81)
  • Chapter 6 How Culture Works (p. 109)
  • Chapter 7 Women, Men, and Culture: The Roots of Inequality (p. 133)
  • Chapter 8 Expendable Beings, Disposable Lives (p. 159)
  • Chapter 9 Earning Manhood, and the Male Ego (p. 187)
  • Chapter 10 Exploiting Men Through Marriage and Sex (p. 221)
  • Chapter 11 What Else, What Next? (p. 249)
  • Sources and References (p. 181)
  • Index (p. 299)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Drawing on psychological and sociological theory in what he acknowledges is an essayistic rather than scholarly work, Florida State psychology professor Baumeister addresses gender roles and equality in a simplistic and even baffling book (as an example of male-female cooperation, he writes, "Most men voted to extend the vote to women," overlooking how long it took before men agreed to cast that vote). The reason men dominate culture and rule the world, he observes, is not that men are superior to women or have designed patriarchy to oppress women but rather that culture grew out of male relationships, which resulted in large structures containing many people (whether to engage in trade or in war), and thus men were always in charge. Whereas women, in Baumeister's view, seek close one-on-one relationships that are not culture-building. The author's belief that future cultures will be better off if they recognize and accept the differences between men and women can sound an awful lot like a "separate but equal" argument. Ultimately, though, Baumeister's repetitious and circular arguments fail to contribute any fresh ideas to the gender debate. (Sept.) Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Roy F. Baumeister is the Eppes Eminent Professor of Psychology and head of the social psychology graduate program at Florida State University. He received his Ph.D. in social psychology from Princeton in 1978 and did a postdoctoral fellowship in sociology at the University of California at Berkeley.

Baumeister has worked at Case Western Reserve University, as well as the University of Texas, University of Virginia, Max-Planck-Institute, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Baumeister's has received research grants from the National Institutes of Health and from the Templeton Foundation. His research spans the areas of self and identity, self-regulation, interpersonal rejection and the need to belong, sexuality and gender, aggression, self-esteem, meaning, and self-presentation.

He is the author of nearly 400 publications. His books include Evil: Inside Human Violence and Cruelty , The Cultural Animal , Meanings of Life and Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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