Does feminism discriminate against men? : a debate / Warren Farrell with Steven Svoboda, James P. Sterba.

by Farrell, WarrenLooking glass; Sterba, James PLooking glass; Svoboda, StevenLooking glass.

Series: Point/counterpoint series (Oxford, England): ; Point/counterpoint series: Publisher: New York ; Oxford University Press, 2008.Description: xii, 258 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0195312821; 019531283X; 9780195312829; 9780195312836.Subject(s): Feminism -- United StatesLooking glass | Sex discrimination against men -- United StatesNote: Includes bibliographical references (pages 237-240) and index.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan London College of Fashion
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Printed books 305.31 FAR (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54078633
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Does feminism give a much-needed voice to women in a patriarchal world? Or is the world not really patriarchal? Has feminism begun to level the playing field in a world in which women are more often paid less at work and abused at home? Or are women paid equally for the same work and notabused more at home? Does feminism support equality in education and in the military, or does it discriminate against men by ignoring such issues as male-only draft registration and boys lagging behind in school?The only book of its kind, this volume offers a sharp, lively, and provocative debate on the impact of feminism on men. Warren Farrell--an international best-selling author and leader in both the early women's and current men's movements--praises feminism for opening options for women butcriticizes it for demonizing men, distorting data, and undervaluing the family. In response, James P. Sterba--an acclaimed philosopher and ardent advocate of feminism--maintains that the feminist movement gives a long-neglected voice to women in a male-dominated world and that men are not anoppressed gender in today's America. Their wide-ranging debate covers personal issues, from love, sex, dating, and rape to domestic violence, divorce, and child custody. Farrell and Sterba also look through their contrasting lenses at systemic issues, from the school system to the criminal justicesystem; from the media to the military; and from health care to the workplace.A perfect book to get students thinking and debating, Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men? A Debate is ideal for courses in gender studies, sociology, psychology, economics, feminist philosophy, and contemporary moral issues. It is also compelling reading for anyone interested in the futureof men and women.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 237-240) and index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. ix)
  • Acknowledgments (p. xi)
  • Part 1 Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men?
  • 1 Do We Need Men's Studies? History Is Men's Studies, Right? (p. 7)
  • 2 Do Men Have the Power? (p. 13)
  • 3 What the All-Male Draft and the Combat Exclusion of Women Tell Us About Men, Women, and Feminism (p. 20)
  • 4 Why Do Men Die Sooner, and Whose Health Is Being Neglected? (p. 27)
  • 5 Domestic Violence: Who Is Doing the Battering, and What's the Solution? (p. 33)
  • 6 The Politics and Psychology of Rape, Sex, and Love (p. 39)
  • 7 Does the Criminal Justice System Discriminate Against Men? (p. 49)
  • 8 Why Men Earn More: Discrimination? Choices? (p. 56)
  • 9 Are Women Doing Two Jobs While Men Do One? (p. 60)
  • 10 Marriage, Divorce, and Child Custody (p. 68)
  • 11 Does Popular Culture Discriminate Against Men? (p. 80)
  • 12 Are Schools Biased Against Girls? Or Boys? (p. 94)
  • 13 The Future of Feminism and Men (p. 100)
  • Part 2 Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men?
  • 1 Do We Need Men's Studies-Or Is History Men's Studies? (p. 130)
  • 2 Do Men Have the Power-And If So, Would They Want to Change? (p. 132)
  • 3 What the All-Male Draft and the Combat Exclusion of Women Tell Us About Men, Women, and Feminism (p. 136)
  • 4 Why Do Men Die Sooner, and Whose Health Is Being Neglected? (p. 143)
  • 5 Domestic Violence; Who Is Doing the Battering, and What's the Solution? (p. 148)
  • 6 Rape, Date Rape: How Should We Respond? (p. 157)
  • 7 Is the Criminal Justice System Sexist? (p. 167)
  • 8 Why Men Earn More: Discrimination? Choices? (p. 173)
  • 9 Are Women Doing Two Jobs While Men Do One? (p. 182)
  • 10 Marriage, Divorce, and Child Custody (p. 186)
  • 11 Do Popular Culture and the Media Discriminate Against Men? (p. 195)
  • 12 Are Schools Biased Against Women? Or Men? (p. 205)
  • 13 The Future of Feminism and Men (p. 208)
  • Selected Bibliography (p. 237)
  • Index (p. 241)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In the first half of this volume, part of a "point/counterpoint" debates series designed for introductory undergraduate courses in gender studies, sociology, politics, psychology, and ethics, noted men's rights advocate Farrell denounces what he calls the feminist "lace curtain" of silence concerning the extent to which it is men who are truly disadvantaged in modern US society. He argues that feminists demonize, deride, and discriminate against men. In response, feminist philosopher Sterba (Notre Dame) gives a step-by-step rebuttal of Farrell's points. Both offer copious illustrations and a barrage of statistics (much of which is dated, misleading, or spurious). Farrell and Sterba each make some interesting points. But Farrell's indignant enumeration of all the thankless jobs men do (including setting up camping gear, opening jars, and killing spiders) is exasperating and disingenuous, as is his attempt to place joking put-downs of men in greeting cards in the same category as violently abusive pornography. And Sterba's detailed refutations can be tedious and almost petulant in tone. This volume might work in small classroom settings, but for the enormous lecture classes that are increasingly the norm at large universities, the book is probably unusable. Summing Up: Optional. Lower-level undergraduate libraries. A. H. Koblitz Arizona State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James P. Sterba, Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame.

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