Strategic management and organisational dynamics : the challenge of complexity to ways of thinking about organisations / Ralph D. Stacey.

by Stacey, Ralph DLooking glass.

Publisher: Harlow : Financial Times Prentice Hall, 2007.Edition: Fifth edition.Description: xvi, 480 pages ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780273708117; 0273708112.Subject(s): Strategic planningLooking glass | Organizational behaviorLooking glass | ManagementLooking glassNote: Previous ed.: 2003.;
Online resources available.
Note: Bibliography: (pages [451]-466. - Includes index.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Renowned for its unconventional thinking, Strategic Management and Organisational Dynamics continues to be a refreshing alternative for students and lecturers of strategic management specifically looking for 'something different'. Stacey challenges the conceptual orthodoxy of planned strategy, focusing instead on the influence of more complex and unstable forces in the development of strategy. Ideal for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate study, this critically detailed account deals with up-to-the minute issues, raising the challenge of complexity within practice and theory.As such it remains unique amongst strategic management text books. In this fifth edition, Stacey also covers contemporary issues including: the links between micro and macro-level activities in the organisation; focus on the gathering interest in 'strategy-as-practice'; the treatment of ethics and values in strategic management;

Previous ed.: 2003.

Online resources available.

Bibliography: (pages [451]-466. - Includes index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of boxes
  • List of figures
  • Preface
  • 1 Thinking about strategy and organisational change
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 The phenomena of interest
  • 1.3 Making sense of the phenomena
  • 1.4 Key features in comparing theories of organisational evolution
  • 1.5 Outline of the book
  • Part 1 Systemic ways of thinking about strategy and organisational dynamics
  • 2 The origins of systems thinking
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 The Scientific Revolution
  • 2.3 Kant: natural systems and autonomous individuals
  • 2.4 Systems thinking in the twentieth century
  • 2.5 Thinking about organisations and their management
  • 2.6 How systems thinking deals with four key questions
  • 2.7 Summary
  • 3 Thinking in terms of strategic choice: cybernetic systems,cognitivist and humanistic psychology
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Cybernetic systems
  • 3.3 Formulating and implementing long-term strategic plans
  • 3.4 Cognitivist and humanistic psychology
  • 3.5 Leadership and the role of groups
  • 3.6 Key debates
  • 3.7 How strategic choice theory deals with four key questions
  • 3.8 Summary
  • 4 Thinking in terms of organisational learning and knowledge creation: systems dynamics, cognitivist, humanistic and constructivist psychology
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Systems dynamics: nonlinearity and positive feedback
  • 4.3 Personal mastery and mental models: cognitivist psychology
  • 4.4 Building a shared vision and team learning: humanistic psychology
  • 4.5 The impact of vested interests on organisational learning
  • 4.6 Knowledge management: cognitivist and constructivist psychology
  • 4.7 Communities of practice
  • 4.8 Key debates
  • 4.9 How learning organisation theory deals with four key questions
  • 4.10 Summary
  • 5 Thinking in terms of organisational psychodynamics: open systems and psychoanalytic perspectives
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Open systems theory
  • 5.3 Psychoanalysis and unconscious processes
  • 5.4 Open systems and unconscious processes
  • 5.5 Leaders and groups
  • 5.6 How open systems/psychoanalytic perspectives deal withfour key questions
  • 5.7 Summary
  • 6 Thinking about participation in systems: second-order systems and autopoiesis
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 First- and second-order systems thinking
  • 6.3 Interactive planning and soft systems thinking
  • 6.4 Critical systems thinking
  • 6.5 Autopoiesis
  • 6.6 Summary
  • 7 Thinking about strategy process
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Rational process and its critics: bounded rationality
  • 7.3 Rational process and its critics: trial and error action
  • 7.4 A contingency view of process
  • 7.5 Institutions, routines, politics and cognitive frames
  • 7.6 Process and time
  • 7.7 Strategy process: a review
  • 7.8 The activity-based view
  • 7.9 The systemic way of thinking about process and practice
  • 7.10 Summary
  • Part 2 The challenge of complexity to ways of thinking
  • 8 The complexity sciences
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Mathematical chaos theory
  • 8.3 The theory of dissipative structures
  • 8.4 Complex adaptive systems
  • 8.5 Different interpretations of complexity
  • 8.6 Summary
  • 9 Systemic applications of complexity sciences toorganisations
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Modelling industries as complex systems
  • 9.3 Understanding organisations as complex systems
  • 9.4 How systemic applications of complexity sciences deal with four key questions
  • 9.5 Summary
  • Part 3 Complex responsive processes as a way of thinking about strategy and organisational dynamics
  • 10 Responsive processes thinking
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Responsive processes thinking
  • 10.3 Chaos, complexity and analogy
  • 10.4 Time and responsive processes
  • 10.5 The differences between systemic process and responsive processes thinking
  • 10.6 Summary
  • 11 The emergence of organisational strategy in local communicative interaction: complex responsive processes of conversation
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Human communication and the conversation of gestures: the social act
  • 11.3 Ordinary conversation in organisations
  • 11.4 The dynamics of conversation
  • 11.5 Leaders and the activities of strategising
  • 11.6 Summary
  • Reflective management narrative 1 Strategic development of a merger: formulating and implementing at the same time
  • 12 The link between the local communicative inter

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ralph Stacey is Professor of Management at the Business School, University of Hertfordshire. He is the director of the Complexity and Management Centre at the University of Hertfordshire and author of a number of books and papers on complexity and organisations.

Other editions of this work

No cover image available Strategic management and organisational dynamics : by Stacey, Ralph D. ©2003
No cover image available Strategic management and organisational dynamics : by Stacey, Ralph D. ©2000

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