Intaglio : acrylic-resist etching, collagraphy, engraving, drypoint, mezzotint : the complete safety-first system for creative printmaking / Robert Adam, Carol Robertson.

by Adam, RobertLooking glass; Robertson, CarolLooking glass.

Publisher: London : Thames & Hudson, 2007.Description: 240 pages : illustrations (chiefly colour) ; 26 cm.ISBN: 0500513430; 9780500513439; 9780500513439.Subject(s): Intaglio printingLooking glass | Prints -- TechniqueLooking glassNote: Includes index.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

With clear step-by-step instructions and over 225 illustrations, mostly in colour, this book describes techniques that avoid traditional toxic materials in order to achieve stunning prints the modern way.

Includes index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • How Intaglio Printmaking Developed
  • The origins of intaglio (p. 8)
  • The innovators and their techniques (p. 8)
  • The Move Towards Safer Working Methods
  • Traditional intaglio techniques and their implications for health, safety and the environment (p. 27)
  • Plates and traditional plate preparation methods (p. 27)
  • Traditional resists, their solvents and etching the plate (p. 27)
  • Traditional collagraphic plate-making (p. 31)
  • Traditional inks and their solvents (p. 31)
  • Sourcing information about chemicals and their correct use (p. 32)
  • How chemicals enter the body (p. 33)
  • High-risk groups (p. 34)
  • A complete safer intaglio system (p. 34)
  • Planning and Equipping a Studio for Intaglio Printmaking
  • Planning the studio (p. 37)
  • Equipping the studio (p. 40)
  • General studio facilities and equipment (p. 40)
  • Equipment and workstation for direct intaglio methods (p. 46)
  • Equipment and workstations for acrylic-resist etching methods (p. 47)
  • Equipment and workstation for collagraph methods (p. 50)
  • Equipment and facilities for light-sensitive intaglio methods (p. 50)
  • Workstations for making positives (p. 51)
  • Equipment and facilities for printing (p. 52)
  • Good studio practice (p. 56)
  • Personal equipment (p. 58)
  • The Principles of Intaglio Printmaking
  • The artist's concept (p. 59)
  • Making an intaglio plate (p. 60)
  • Subtractive methods (p. 60)
  • Additive methods (p. 63)
  • Combined intaglio methods (p. 63)
  • Printing from the plate (p. 63)
  • Preparing the Plate
  • Selecting plate materials (p. 66)
  • Cutting and filing plates (p. 69)
  • Cleaning and de-oxidizing plates (p. 70)
  • Graining the plate surface (p. 71)
  • Polishing the plate surface (p. 75)
  • Degreasing and rinsing plates (p. 78)
  • Direct Intaglio Methods
  • Engraving (p. 82)
  • Drypoint (p. 86)
  • Mezzotint (p. 90)
  • Scraping and burnishing (p. 93)
  • Repoussage (p. 94)
  • Air-abrading techniques, including the use of light-sensitive and other masks (p. 94)
  • Etching
  • The etching process and the use of resists (p. 96)
  • Etching working practice checklist (p. 98)
  • Plate-backing resists (p. 99)
  • Types of plate-backing resist and their application methods (p. 100)
  • Hard resists (p. 102)
  • Making a guide drawing (p. 103)
  • Drawing into the resist (p. 103)
  • Working into the resist to create broad open areas (p. 104)
  • Types of hard resist and their application methods (p. 105)
  • Soft resists (p. 110)
  • Creating collage-type impressions (p. 111)
  • The classical offsetting drawing method (p. 113)
  • Drawing directly into the soft resist (p. 115)
  • Types of soft resist and their application methods (p. 115)
  • Stop-out resist and controlling tone (p. 119)
  • Painting methods (p. 120)
  • Drawing into the stop-out resist (p. 121)
  • Correcting or editing an image (p. 121)
  • Stopping out and the stage-biting process (p. 122)
  • Types of stop-out resist (p. 123)
  • Creating tonal structures and the aquatint method (p. 124)
  • Using the puncturing method (p. 125)
  • Creating a scrobiculated surface using soft resist (p. 126)
  • Creating an etched ink-holding grid using soft resist (p. 127)
  • Creating an aquatint (p. 128)
  • Types of acrylic resist for aquatint (p. 136)
  • Wash resists (p. 138)
  • Painting methods (p. 138)
  • Types of wash resist (p. 140)
  • Photoresists (p. 140)
  • Lamination method (p. 142)
  • Exposing the photoresist (p. 144)
  • Developing the photoresist (p. 146)
  • Curing, drying, etching or working the plate further (p. 148)
  • Other types of resist (p. 148)
  • Oily resists (p. 148)
  • Waterproof marker pens (p. 150)
  • Photocopy transfers (p. 150)
  • Adhesive tapes (p. 151)
  • Etching the plate (p. 151)
  • Mordants (p. 151)
  • Mordants which are not recommended (p. 152)
  • Mordants which are recommended (p. 154)
  • Collagraphy
  • Collagraphy (p. 162)
  • Creating fine linear work (p. 164)
  • Creating contour lines (p. 166)
  • Creating textures, tones and patterns (p. 167)
  • Creating, lines, washes and tonal areas with carborundum (p. 172)
  • Creating mezzotint effects and pale tones (p. 173)
  • Using screenprinting techniques (p. 176)
  • Photocollagraphy (p. 176)
  • Using dry film photoresist to create photocollagraph plates (p. 177)
  • Using flexographic water-washable photopolymer plates as photocollagraphs (p. 179)
  • Positives
  • Using positives in light-sensitive intaglio printmaking (p. 181)
  • Substrates and materials used for positives (p. 181)
  • Autographic positives (p. 181)
  • Photographic positives (p. 189)
  • Digital positives (p. 190)
  • Photocopy positives (p. 191)
  • Halftone contact screens (p. 191)
  • Colour separation and process printing (p. 192)
  • Inking-Up and Printing Methods
  • Approaches to printing (p. 193)
  • The intaglio inking-up and printing method (p. 193)
  • A la poupee (p. 198)
  • Embossing (p. 198)
  • Chine colle (p. 199)
  • Roll-over and viscosity printing methods (p. 201)
  • Monotypes (p. 203)
  • Combining intaglio with other media (p. 206)
  • Registration methods (p. 208)
  • Inks and additives (p. 210)
  • Making inks for intaglio methods (p. 212)
  • Removing Resists, Collagraph Materials and Inks from the Plate
  • Sodium carbonate stripping solution (p. 214)
  • Lascaux Remover and Mystrol (p. 215)
  • Vegetable oil (p. 215)
  • Printing Substrates
  • Paper (p. 217)
  • Preparing the paper for printing (p. 219)
  • Other substrates and printing into plaster (p. 220)
  • Collating and Presenting Intaglio Prints
  • Collating intaglio prints (p. 222)
  • Presenting intaglio prints (p. 224)
  • Storing plates (p. 224)
  • International Suppliers of Materials (p. 230)
  • Glossary (p. 235)
  • Picture Credits (p. 237)
  • Index (p. 238)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Adam and Robertson (Graal Press) offer a how-to book on intaglio printmaking using nontoxic methods. Most of the information is old news to those in the profession, since these methods have been used extensively for nearly ten years. They were popularized by Keith Howard, Mark Zaffron, and Nik Semenoff, each of whom has shared his procedures with printmakers through conferences, books, and Web sites. Howard's most recent book, The Contemporary Printmaker: Intaglio-Type and Acrylic Resist Etching (2003), covers some of the same material as Adam and Robertson's. However, theirs includes more international information on nontoxic initiatives throughout the world and is far easier to read than Howard's. Additionally, Intaglio provides more background material, beyond the steps in completing a process. It does not include notes or a bibliography, but does have an international list of suppliers and a glossary. The writing is good, well organized, and easy to follow; reproductions include 199 in color and 29 tonal images. A good addition to the existing materials on nontoxic intaglio printmaking, this book will be used by practitioners rather than researchers. Summing Up: Recommended. Professionals and practitioners. C. Stroh Western Michigan University

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