Angelica Kauffman : art and sensibility / Angela Rosenthal.

by Rosenthal, AngelaLooking glass.

Publisher: New Haven ; Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press, [2006]Description: viii, 342 pages : illustrations (chiefly colour), portraits (chiefly colour) ; 29 cm.ISBN: 0300103336.Uniform titles: Angelika Kauffmann. English.Subject(s): Kauffmann, Angelica, 1741-1807Looking glass | Portraits, BritishLooking glass | PortraitsLooking glass | Women artistsLooking glass | Women painters -- Switzerland
Contents:
Introduction : becoming pictures -- Penelope and the weaving of narrative -- Intersubjective portrayal -- Sentimental spaces -- The inner Orient -- Kauffman's helicon -- Civilizing femininity -- The image of Angelica.
Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 317-334) and index. Language: Translated from the German.
List(s) this item appears in: Women artists/designers
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan London College of Fashion
Main collection
Printed books 759.092 KAU (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54021891
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This work studies the 18th century Swiss artist who was renowned for her sensitivity & ambition. Analysing her pictorial strategies and contribution to portraiture as a field of representation, Angela Rosenthal includes a discussion of Kauffman's self-portraits.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 317-334) and index.

Introduction : becoming pictures -- Penelope and the weaving of narrative -- Intersubjective portrayal -- Sentimental spaces -- The inner Orient -- Kauffman's helicon -- Civilizing femininity -- The image of Angelica.

Translated from the German.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Kauffman has been the subject of numerous studies by feminist art historians, who find the universal esteem in which she was held by her contemporaries and her professional success rich territory to examine the role of 18th-century female artists. Rosenthal's contribution to this literature, she asserts, is not a program of "historical recovery," but a reading of the "intersubjective relations" she finds in Kauffman's art. This means that in chapter 1, where she examines Kauffman's recurrent representations of the Homeric heroine Penelope, the analysis is done under the auspices of Freud, Barthes, Kristeva, and Habermas; as a consequence, Ulysses' wife emerges not too convincingly as a multivalent symbol signifying absence, female artistic creativity, a fictional sister, even the loss of the artist's mother. Discussion of Kauffman's portraiture is placed in the context of her contemporaries Reynolds, Gainsborough, and Vigee-Lebrun, but again the interpretations often strain credulity, the most egregious being that the lap dog in one of Reynolds's portraits of Mrs. Abingdon symbolizes "female genitalia." In short, while occasionally offering insights into Kauffman's work, the book is flawed by a relentless need to have pictures conform to predetermined theoretical principles. ^BSumming Up: Optional. General readers; lower-division undergraduates through graduate students. L. R. Matteson formerly, University of Southern California

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