For space / Doreen Massey.

by Massey, Doreen BLooking glass.

Publisher: London : SAGE, 2005.Description: viii, 222 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 1412903629; 9781412903622.Subject(s): Geographical perceptionLooking glass | Political geographyLooking glass | GlobalizationLooking glass | Regionalism -- PhilosophyNote: Bibliography: pages 204-216. Includes index.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"The reason for my enthusiasm for this book is that Doreen Massey manages to describe a certain way of perceiving movement in space which I have been - and still am - working with on different levels in my work: i.e. the idea that space is not something static and neutral, a frozen entity, but is something intertwined with time and thus ever changing - also when we are not occupying it. Doreen's descriptions of her journey through England for example are clear and precise accounts of this idea, and she very sharply characterizes the attempts not to recognize this idea as utopian and nostalgic."
- Olafur Eliasson

In this book, Doreen Massey makes an impassioned argument for revitalising our imagination of space. She takes on some well-established assumptions from philosophy, and some familiar ways of characterising the twenty-first century world, and shows how they restrain our understanding of both the challenge and the potential of space.

The way we think about space matters. It inflects our understandings of the world, our attitudes to others, our politics. It affects, for instance, the way we understand globalisation, the way we approach cities, the way we develop, and practice, a sense of place. If time is the dimension of change then space is the dimension of the social: the contemporaneous co-existence of others. That is its challenge, and one that has been persistently evaded. For Space pursues its argument through philosophical and theoretical engagement, and through telling personal and political reflection. Doreen Massey asks questions such as how best to characterise these so-called spatial times, how it is that implicit spatial assumptions inflect our politics, and how we might develop a responsibility for place beyond place.

This book is "for space" in that it argues for a reinvigoration of the spatiality of our implicit cosmologies. For Space is essential reading for any

Bibliography: pages 204-216. Includes index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Part 1 Setting The Scene
  • Opening Propositions
  • Part 2 Unpromising Associations
  • Space/Representation
  • The Prison-House of Synchrony
  • The Horizontalities of Deconstruction
  • The Life in Space
  • Part 3 Living In Spatial Times?
  • Spatialising the History of Modernity
  • Instantaneity/Depthlessness
  • Aspatial Globalisation
  • (Contrary to Popular Opinion) Space can not be Annihilated by Time
  • Elements for Alternatives
  • Part 4 Reorientations
  • Slices through Space
  • The Elusiveness of Place
  • Part 5 A Relational Politics Of The Spatial
  • Throwntogetherness: The Politics of the Event of Place
  • There are No Rules of Space and Place
  • Making and Contesting Time-Spaces

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