Arts under pressure : promoting cultural diversity in the age of globalization / Joost Smiers.

by Smiers, JoostLooking glass.

Publisher: London : Zed Books, 2003.Description: xi, 275 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1842772627; 1842772635.Subject(s): Arts and globalizationLooking glass | Arts and societyLooking glass | Intellectual propertyLooking glassNote: Includes bibliographical references (pages 246-260) and index.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Arts Under Pressure analyses the relevant forces behind decision making in cultural matters worldwide under the influence of economic globalisation.

The book deals with all the arts, in all parts of the world and focuses on the cycle of creation, production, distribution, promotion, reception and influence. It asks: who has the power to decide what reaches audiences, in what quantities, with what contents and surrounded by what kinds of ambiances? Refuting the 'natural' existence of a mass culture, Arts Under Pressure argues that globally dominant artistic creations are produced, distributed and promoted on a mass scale that destroys the diversity any society desperately needs. Smiers argues that countries must take culture out of the grip of the WTO and sign a new International Convention on Cultural Diversity.

Smiers concludes with a completely new vision of copyright, advantageous to artists, third world countries and the public domain.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 246-260) and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A first-person argument for replacing copyright with national policies that encourage the exchange of intellectual property, compensate the creators, and protect diverse, uncensored arts emerges gradually from this mostly third-person narrative. Smiers (political science of the arts, Utrecht School of Arts, The Netherlands) intermixes the theory of cultural scholars with real world examples. Emphasizing the third world, he sheds light on countries usually omitted from works on intellectual property. Globally, Smiers asks how local and regional arts producers (both individuals and businesses) can fend off ravaging economic forces and media conglomerates that view art as ripe-for-exploitation, low-hanging fruit. Of more use to cultural scholars and futurists than to those confronting practical copyright applications, the book was sponsored and is being distributed in the third world by Hivos, the Humanist Institute for Co-operation with Developing Countries. The rich bibliographies of prime sources are especially useful in a field where much up-to-date material can only be found on the shifting Internet sands. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. M. M. Doherty University of South Florida

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Joost Smiers is Professor of Political Science of the Arts at the Utrecht School of the Arts, the Netherlands, and formerly Visiting Professor, Department of World Arts and Cultures, UCLA, Los Angeles.
Joost Smiers is Professor of Political Science of the Arts at the Utrecht School of the Arts, the Netherlands, and formerly Visiting Professor, Department of World Arts and Cultures, UCLA, Los Angeles.

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