Dutch sneakers and flea keepers : 14 more stories / by Calef Brown.

by Brown, CalefLooking glass.

Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2000.Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : colour il. ; 27cm.ISBN: 061805183X.Subject(s): American poetryLooking glass | Children's poetry, AmericanLooking glassSummary: Summary: Fourteen poems about quirky subjects and characters.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Long loan Camberwell College of Arts
Main collection
Printed books 769 BRO (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 34388753
Total reservations: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In the tradition of Edward Lear, Calef Brown has fashioned fourteen nonsense poems so wacky that both young and old will be unable to suppress their laughter.Invented words and sounds and their visual counterparts create both an audible and a visual feast.This is the kind of silliness children (and many adults) relish. AUTHOR Calef Brown began his career as a tour guide at an early age, when he discovered the simple joy of pointing things out. He is also an artist, writer, and frequently a blue elephant. Mr. Brown's illustrations have appeared in many magazines and newspapers, and his paintings have been exhibited in N.Y., L.A., S.F., and other places without fancy initials, like Osaka and Rome Ages: 5-8 Grades K-3

Summary: Fourteen poems about quirky subjects and characters.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Brown follows his bestselling Polka Bats and Octopus Slacks with another traveling circus of poems. The table of contents resembles a set of sideshow marquees, letting readers know they are in for offbeat attractions. A prime example is "Mysterious Fish": "Mysterious fish tank./ Mysterious fish./ Green like asparagus./ Flat like a dish./ Toss in a peppercorn,/ then make a wish./ Mysterious fish tank./ Mysterious fish." This weird and wonderfully catchy chant accompanies an eerie image of a bored, flounder-like creature in a luminous, slightly slimy tank. The boardwalk motif continues in one of the title poems, in which an unseen huckster promises "Fleakeepers" that they can "Make lots of cash!/ Raise fleas in your basement,/ just feed 'em your trash." Brown's cabinet of oddities also includes the big-eared "Tattlesnake" ("It spies on you,/ tells on you,/ then disappears") and a "Runaway Waffle" whose spindly limbs give it a likeness to the retro-icon Mr. Peanut. The author's illustrations suggest a zany mix of post-modern wit and folk art na‹vet‚, and his minor-key palette complements the surreal verse. If Jack Prelutsky collaborated with Howard Finster, the result might look something like this. All ages. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Calef Brown began his career as a tour guide at an early age, when he discovered the simple joy of pointing things out. He is also an artist, writer, and frequently a blue elephant. Mr. Brown's illustrations have appeared in many magazines and newspapers, and his paintings have been exhibited in N.Y., L.A., S.F., and other places without fancy initials, like Osaka and Rome. He lives in Maine.

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