Cyberpower : the culture and politics of cyberspace and the Internet / Tim Jordan.

by Jordan, Tim, 1959-Looking glass.

Publisher: London : Routledge, 1999.Description: vii,254 pages : illustrations ; 25cm.ISBN: 041517077X; 0415170788.Subject(s): Cyberspace -- Social aspectsLooking glass | Internet -- Social aspectsLooking glass | Power (Social sciences)Looking glass | Telematics -- Social aspectsNote: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Short loan Central Saint Martins
Main collection
Printed books 306.46 JOR (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 1113951X
Long loan Chelsea College of Arts
Main collection
Printed books 303.483 JOR (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 35308346
Long loan Wimbledon College of Arts
Main collection
Printed books 303.483 JOR (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 54039000367766
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This is the first complete introduction to and analysis of the politics of the internet. Chapters are arranged around key words and use case studies to guide the reader through a wealth of material.
Cyberpower presents all the key concepts of cyberspace including:
* power and cyberspace
* the virtual individual
* society in cyberspace
* imagination and the internet.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of illustrations (p. viii)
  • Acknowledgements (p. ix)
  • 1 Power and cyberspace (p. 1)
  • Key concepts (p. 1)
  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • Cyberpower (p. 2)
  • Power (p. 7)
  • Max Weber: power as a possession (p. 9)
  • Barry Barnes: power as social order (p. 11)
  • Michel Foucault: power as domination (p. 15)
  • 2 Cyberspace and the matrix (p. 20)
  • Key concepts (p. 20)
  • Introduction (p. 21)
  • Cyberspace: the science fiction vision (p. 23)
  • Cyberspace: the matrix of computers (p. 33)
  • History of a technology (p. 33)
  • Size, users and uses (p. 49)
  • Conclusion (p. 55)
  • Barlovian cyberspace (p. 55)
  • 3 The virtual individual (p. 59)
  • Key concepts (p. 59)
  • Introduction (p. 60)
  • Axes of individual cyberpower: identity, hierarchy, information (p. 65)
  • Identity fluidity (p. 65)
  • Anti-hierarchical (p. 79)
  • A world made of information (p. 85)
  • Cyberpower at the individual (p. 87)
  • Cyberpower as a possession (p. 88)
  • Cyberpolitics: access and rights (p. 89)
  • Conclusion (p. 96)
  • 4 The virtual social I: the social in cyberspace (p. 100)
  • Key concepts (p. 100)
  • Introduction (p. 101)
  • The social and the individual (p. 107)
  • Technopower (p. 110)
  • The spiral of technopower (p. 115)
  • Information overload (p. 117)
  • The complete spiral (p. 128)
  • The technopower elite (p. 135)
  • 5 The virtual social II: the social between online and offline (p. 142)
  • Key concepts (p. 142)
  • Introduction (p. 142)
  • Cyberspace and production, consumption and politics in information societies (p. 145)
  • Production (p. 147)
  • Consumption (p. 153)
  • Politics (p. 162)
  • The informational space of flows (p. 167)
  • Online and offline (p. 171)
  • 6 The virtual imaginary (p. 179)
  • Key concepts (p. 179)
  • Introduction (p. 179)
  • The collective imagination (p. 181)
  • Visions of heaven... (p. 85)
  • Cyborgs (p. 187)
  • Information codes (p. 190)
  • ... and hell (p. 196)
  • Superpanopticon: cyborgs, minutiae and fear of cyberspace (p. 201)
  • Fear itself (p. 204)
  • Cyberspace's imaginary (p. 205)
  • 7 Cyberpower (p. 208)
  • Key concepts (p. 208)
  • Introduction (p. 208)
  • Relations between three types of cyberpower (p. 210)
  • The first war of cyberspace: elites and grassroots (p. 214)
  • Notes (p. 219)
  • Glossary (p. 229)
  • Bibliography (p. 233)
  • Index (p. 248)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Tim Jordan is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology. University of East London.

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