How science works [electronic resource].

by Alexander Street Press [supplier.]Looking glass; Glasshead Television and Web [producer.].

Series: Education in video: Publisher: [England] : Teachers TV/UK Department of Education, 2007.Description: 1 online resource (60 min.).Other title: How science works : bad vibes; How science works : chasing the wind; How science works : engineering gold; How science works : in the classroom.Subject(s): Chemical engineeringLooking glass | Climatic changesLooking glass | Science -- Study and teaching (Secondary) -- Great BritainLooking glass | Science -- Study and teaching -- Activity programs | SoundsLooking glass | Instructional television programs | Nonfiction television programsLooking glassPreviously released as DVD.Note: Title from resource description page (viewed Mar. 5, 2012).Language: This edition in English. Summary: Ever wondered what the worst sound in the world is? Acoustic engineer Professor Trevor Cox did. He developed an internet experiment that reached over one and a half million participants. To make sure that his experiment was as reliable as possible Trevor had to design a website that was easy to access and to understand. He also had to make sure all the sounds that people would hear were of a similar loudness. But that wasn't all; it appears that we all get sound fatigue after a while and so we tend to find the first few noises on the website more horrible than the later ones. Trevor's solution was to randomise the order the sounds are played. After a few million visitors any bias caused by the order of the sounds was smoothed out.Trevor's experiment got him news headlines around the world, but more importantly it demonstrated a new way of doing acoustic research over the internet. And the worst sound in the world? You'll have to watch the programme and find out!Summary: Our climate is changing. Is it our fault? And what can we do about it? These are questions that are difficult to answer - but answer them we must. And the way to do that is through science. Dr. Maggie Aderin is one of the scientists committed to studying climate change. She leads a team that's building an instrument to be launched into space on the Aeolus satellite, to read wind patterns as it orbits the Earth.Maggie began her scientific career as an astronomer. It was only after working on such diverse projects as airborne missile warning systems, radar-based landmine detectors and instrument building for a telescope in Chile, that she was in a position to lead this prestigious project. Measuring wind patterns is only one part of the scientific effort to understand our planet's climate. When Maggie's instrument has done its work, it will just be part of a much bigger picture. In the meantime Maggie is convinced that we all need to do our bit to reduce our impact on the planet.Summary: Students at King Edward VII School in Sheffield try out some of the activities connected to the How Science Works programmes. Year 10 students work out the best lubricant for a ski, having watched Peter Styring developing a self-lubricating ski in the programme Engineering Gold . The key to this activity is to introduce it in an open-ended way and let the students think for themselves, so they develop their own ideas and come up with their own questions and answers.Other Year 10 pupils watch the programme Chasing the Wind , which shows rocket scientist Dr. Maggie Aderin's efforts to build an instrument to measure wind patterns from space. The students are assigned roles and have to present an argument for or against the idea that human activity is damaging the Earth's climate. Only after their presentations can they step out of role to discuss their personal view.Summary: While watching some kids liberally smearing their skis with all kinds of substances, from vegetable oil to washing-up liquid, Professor Peter Styring had one of those What if? moments. Peter is a chemical engineer and has devoted much of his working life to designing systems in which liquids flow continually. Therefore he was exactly the right man to design a self-lubricating ski.Peter's first attempts proved the idea was possible and he found himself going downhill unexpectedly quickly. But nobody was going to invest in skis that hadn't been thoroughly tested, so some serious lab work was required. Over 500 formulations were tried before Peter hit upon the perfect lubricant. And a good deal of monotonous testing with a plank and a lab jack were required before Peter could take his idea to the big ski companies.Further testing in real Alpine conditions looks good and Peter is confident that the first skier to use his system in the Olympics will win gold!Online access: How science works: bad vibes
How science works: chasing the wind
How science works: engineering gold
How science works: in the classroom
Item type Home library Collection Class number Status Date due Barcode Item reservations
Online resource Electronic Resources
Online resources
Streaming media Access available online
Total reservations: 0

Title from resource description page (viewed Mar. 5, 2012).

Ever wondered what the worst sound in the world is? Acoustic engineer Professor Trevor Cox did. He developed an internet experiment that reached over one and a half million participants. To make sure that his experiment was as reliable as possible Trevor had to design a website that was easy to access and to understand. He also had to make sure all the sounds that people would hear were of a similar loudness. But that wasn't all; it appears that we all get sound fatigue after a while and so we tend to find the first few noises on the website more horrible than the later ones. Trevor's solution was to randomise the order the sounds are played. After a few million visitors any bias caused by the order of the sounds was smoothed out.Trevor's experiment got him news headlines around the world, but more importantly it demonstrated a new way of doing acoustic research over the internet. And the worst sound in the world? You'll have to watch the programme and find out!

Our climate is changing. Is it our fault? And what can we do about it? These are questions that are difficult to answer - but answer them we must. And the way to do that is through science. Dr. Maggie Aderin is one of the scientists committed to studying climate change. She leads a team that's building an instrument to be launched into space on the Aeolus satellite, to read wind patterns as it orbits the Earth.Maggie began her scientific career as an astronomer. It was only after working on such diverse projects as airborne missile warning systems, radar-based landmine detectors and instrument building for a telescope in Chile, that she was in a position to lead this prestigious project. Measuring wind patterns is only one part of the scientific effort to understand our planet's climate. When Maggie's instrument has done its work, it will just be part of a much bigger picture. In the meantime Maggie is convinced that we all need to do our bit to reduce our impact on the planet.

Students at King Edward VII School in Sheffield try out some of the activities connected to the How Science Works programmes. Year 10 students work out the best lubricant for a ski, having watched Peter Styring developing a self-lubricating ski in the programme Engineering Gold . The key to this activity is to introduce it in an open-ended way and let the students think for themselves, so they develop their own ideas and come up with their own questions and answers.Other Year 10 pupils watch the programme Chasing the Wind , which shows rocket scientist Dr. Maggie Aderin's efforts to build an instrument to measure wind patterns from space. The students are assigned roles and have to present an argument for or against the idea that human activity is damaging the Earth's climate. Only after their presentations can they step out of role to discuss their personal view.

While watching some kids liberally smearing their skis with all kinds of substances, from vegetable oil to washing-up liquid, Professor Peter Styring had one of those What if? moments. Peter is a chemical engineer and has devoted much of his working life to designing systems in which liquids flow continually. Therefore he was exactly the right man to design a self-lubricating ski.Peter's first attempts proved the idea was possible and he found himself going downhill unexpectedly quickly. But nobody was going to invest in skis that hadn't been thoroughly tested, so some serious lab work was required. Over 500 formulations were tried before Peter hit upon the perfect lubricant. And a good deal of monotonous testing with a plank and a lab jack were required before Peter could take his idea to the big ski companies.Further testing in real Alpine conditions looks good and Peter is confident that the first skier to use his system in the Olympics will win gold!

Previously released as DVD.

This edition in English.

Footer